sort algorithm


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Related to sort algorithm: Bubble sort algorithm

sort algorithm

[′sȯrt ¦al·gə‚rith·əm]
(computer science)
The methods followed in arranging a set of data items into a sequence according to precise rules.

sort algorithm

A formula used to reorder data into a new sequence. Like all complicated problems, there are many solutions that can achieve the same results, and one sort algorithm can re-sequence data faster than another. In the early 1960s, when magnetic tape was "the" storage medium, the sale of a computer system may have hinged on the sort algorithm, since without direct access capability on disk, every transaction had to be sorted into the sequence of the master files in order to update them. Today, sorting is not quite as conspicuous a process as it used to be; however, reports are still presented in sequential order, and myriad indexes to hard disk data must be maintained in a sequential order.

In-Memory Sorting
Today's considerably larger memories enable many sorts to be performed entirely in memory. However, if there is insufficient memory, a sort program may be able to store data that is partially sorted temporarily on disk and merge that data later into the final sequence. See bubble sort, insertion sort, merge sort, quick sort, selection sort, pigeonhole sort and counting sort.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most important advantages of the radix sort algorithm is the fact that it is easy to parallelize, based on the reduction of the counting sort used at each pass to a parallel prefix or sum operation (Satish et al.
The sort algorithm is employed to develop a merged list of pickups and deliveries, thereby setting priorities for vehicle routing.
The package contains a variety of user and programmer interfaces to a parallel processing sort algorithm in a coroutine architecture.
Once adequately funded, LaborHub's founders designed and implemented a whole new, and quite unique internal information system based on set of human-friendly search and sort algorithms that makes matching moving families to appropriately-skilled movers an extremely simplified process - infinitely easier than the founders' earlier approaches.
The fact that there are comparison sort algorithms that are O(n log n) (heap sort, for example) tells us that the problem of sorting-by-comparisons is [Theta](n log n).