South Africa Freedom Day

South Africa Freedom Day

April 27
In 1652, the Dutch East India Trading Company set up a station in Cape Town, South Africa, to service passing ships. After that, European pioneers began to colonize South Africa. In 1657, colonial authorities started giving land to the European settlers. As more Europeans arrived and built their farms, the need for land and labor grew. The settlers began spreading into other areas, and they brought people from East Africa and Madagascar to serve as slaves.
By the mid-1700s, even though there were more slaves than European colonists in South Africa, the white colonists continued to maintain power and authority. Throughout South Africa the minority white population practiced apartheid, an official policy of segregation that involved discrimination against non-white citizens in political, legal, and economic matters. Black South Africans faced stifling discrimination in all areas of their lives. Intense pressure from other countries forced the South African government to put an end to the practice of apartheid. In February 1990, South African President Frederik Willem de Klerk ended apartheid in the county.
On April 27, 1994, the Republic of South Africa held its first democratic elections. The African National Congress (ANC), an important black organization formed to fight for the freedom and rights of all black citizens, won the election. The new ANC-led government began the reconstruction and development of the country and its institutions, bringing with it socio-economic change that improved the lives of all South Africans, especially the poor.
Every year, the Republic of South Africa celebrates Freedom Day, a public holiday that commemorates the anniversary of the historic day in 1994. Special cultural events and exhibitions are held in various venues around Cape Town, the legislative capital of South Africa, and other locations around the country.
CONTACTS:
South Africa Government
Cape Town, Western Cape South Africa
www.info.gov.za
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mandela speaks on stage at the South Africa Freedom Day concert in Trafalgar Square, London | Mandela speaks on stage at the South Africa Freedom Day concert in Trafalgar Square, London
No strangers to Dubai shores, the band affectionately known by their legions of fans as the "Fishies" are back for yet another beach-front gig tomorrow for South Africa Freedom Day.
The pair met when they performed at a South Africa Freedom Day concert in London's Trafalgar Square in 2001.
Hughes had met the 92-year-old while managing The Corrs, who played at a South Africa Freedom Day concert in London in 2001.
The musician, who had been on his way to play at the South Africa Freedom Day concert in Trafalgar Square, said his first memory of Britain was when he came to in police custody, the court heard.
Concert in Trafalgar Square for Nelson Mandela's Children's Fund and the Prince's Trust to mark the seventh South Africa Freedom Day.
THE CORRS opened yesterday's South Africa Freedom Day show to deafening cheers in the rain as Nelson Mandela prepared to greet the huge crowd from the balcony of South Africa House.
Mandela received a hero's welcome last night as he paid tribute to Britain's role in the fight against apartheid at the South Africa Freedom Day concert in Trafalgar Square.
The 29-year-old songbird from Wolverhampton will join American rock supergroup REM, Irish stars The Corrs and teen sensations Atomic Kitten in the shadow of Nelson's Column for the South Africa Freedom Day concert.
Buck thanked the court for allowing him bail, which means he will be able to perform at the South Africa Freedom Day concert in London's Trafalgar Square being held on 29 April, Reuters reported.
Buck, singer Michael Stipe, guitarist Mike Mills and drummer Bill Berry are due in London to play at the South Africa Freedom Day Concert in Trafalgar Square next Sunday in front of Nelson Mandela and 20,000 fans.
REM are due to play at the South Africa Freedom Day Concert in London's Trafalgar Square next Sunday in front of Nelson Mandela and a 20,000-strong crowd.

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