Spall


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spall

[spȯl]
(engineering)
To reduce irregular stone blocks to an approximate size by chipping with a hammer.
To break off thin chips from, and parallel to, the surface of a material, such as a metal or rock.
(geology)
A fragment removed from the surface of a rock by weathering.
A relatively thin, sharp-edged fragment produced by exfoliation.
A rock fragment produced by chipping with a hammer.
(mining engineering)
To break ore.
(ordnance)
A fragment torn from the surface of an armor plate.

Spall

A small fragment or chip dislodged from the face of a stone or masonry unit by a blow or by the action caused by the elements, such as a freezing and thawing cycle.

spall

A small fragment or chip removed from the face of a stone or masonry unit by a blow or by action of the elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
is issue goes way beyond politics, we are talking about real people's lives here, coping with a devastating diagnosis and all the stress that this carries," Mrs Spall, acting as an advocate for Mr Williams, wrote.
And I said, 'All right, if this is what it's gonna take,' '' Spall recalls.
Spall recreates Turner as a rascal who, though "phlegm-filled", produced epic artworks in a spiritualistic way that was revolutionary and radical.
It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work with a company with ethics and ideals so compatible with my own," Spall told The Grocer.
PX-2100 can be sprayed over any surface hard enough to cause a projectile to spall, such as aluminum, ceramic or steel.
We were repairing a spall at another location when we heard two loud booms," said Airman Cox, who is deployed from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.
It carries a three-person crew and is equipped with a modular, expandable armor system of ceramic composite material on the outside and a spall liner on the inside.
So is another fine Brit thesp, Timothy Spall, in a small but crucial role.
Once burnout is complete, observe for indications of spall, buckle, weak (soft), chalky of dusty areas on internal surfaces as well as cracks externally.
The process is conducted at 1800[degrees]F to create an adhesive bond that is said to be stronger than a deposited coating and not to chip, peel or spall off of the substrate.
Works by Lincoln and Guba (1985) and Spall (1998) are useful sources for novice researchers contemplating peer debriefing.