Sporulating Bacteria

Sporulating Bacteria

 

bacteria that form a single spore (endospore) within the cell. Sporulating bacteria are usually rodshaped and are called bacilli. Spore formation does not occur in young bacteria but begins in older cells; however, spores are not an obligatory stage in the life cycle of bacilli. Under favorable nutrient conditions, sporulating bacteria may reproduce by fission as vegetative cells over a long period of time, and sporulation begins only under specific conditions. Sporulating bacteria are widely distributed in soil, water, and air. Aerobic sporulating bacteria include the hay bacillus (Bacillus subtilis) and Bacillusmesentericus. Anaerobic forms include Clostridium, the causative agent of tetanus.

References in periodicals archive ?
Absence of the contaminating bacteria growth in medium-H confirms the absence of heterotrophic sporulating bacteria and therefore such observation confirms the isolation of Thiobacillus thermosulfatus in pure form.
Lactic acid bacteria are gram positive, catalase negative, non sporulating bacteria that can ferment various carbohydrates to lactate.
Other difficulties can occur with classifying diseases caused by sporulating bacteria (Clostridium and Bacillus): Their infective spores survive in the soil or in other substrata for very long periods, though they are usually produced after a vegetative growth in the abiotic environment, which can include animal carcasses.