Squanto


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Squanto
Tisquantum
Birthday
BirthplacePatuxet territory, Wampanoag Confederacy (now Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts, U.S.)
Died
NationalityPatuxet tribe
Known for Helping the pilgrims during their first visit to North America

Squanto

or

Tisquantum,

d. 1622, Native American of the Patuxet (or Pawtuxet) band, part of the WampanoagWampanoag
, confederation of Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). In the early 17th cent.
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 confederation. He is sometimes thought to be the Native American taken to England from the Maine coast by George Weymouth (1605) and returned by John Smith in 1615, but it is certain that he was kidnapped by Capt. Thomas Hunt in 1615, lived in England, and returned (1619) to North America with Capt. Thomas Dermer. In 1621 he acted as interpreter in concluding a treaty between the Pilgrim settlers and MassasoitMassasoit
, c.1580–1661, chief of the Wampanoag. He was also known as Ousamequin (spelled in various ways). One of the most powerful native rulers of New England, he went to Plymouth in 1621 and signed a treaty with the Pilgrims, which he faithfully, if warily, observed
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, who had made Squanto a captive. Squanto became friendly with the Plymouth colonists, aiding them particularly in their planting and fishing. He later treacherously sought, and failed, to turn the Pilgrims against Massasoit. While acting as guide and interpreter on William Bradford's expedition around Cape Cod, he fell ill and died.

Squanto

(?1580–1622) Pawtuxet interpreter; born on Cape Cod. He is thought to have been the same as the Indian named Tisquantum who was first captured along the Maine coast and taken to England; he evidently lived there until 1614, when Captain John Smith took him back to Cape Cod. In 1615, Squanto was captured by another English sea captain and sold into slavery in Spain; he escaped and made his way to England. After a brief visit to Newfoundland, he was taken by another English sea captain to serve as a guide along the New England coast but Squanto escaped and made his way to his Pawtuxet homeland; finding his people wiped out by smallpox, he went to live with the neighboring Wampanoags. In 1621 he was introduced to the Pilgrims at Plymouth; he served as their interpreter in their treaty with Massasoit, showed them how to plant corn, where to fish, and generally helped them survive in an unknown environment. He died from a fever while guiding Governor Bradford's expedition around Cape Cod.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her characters' lives and motivations--from You Choose and Rick to their guardian Mina; from Le-a and Squanto to the twin boys Jerusalem and Daniel--aren't fully realized, but what is explored paints a vivid picture.
Should Squanto have disowned his new tribe, who depended on him for their survival?
Since then, it has inducted 38 honorary members into the Hall of Fame, including Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Eli Whitney, Squanto, Arthur Capper, George Washington Carver and Robert J.
With the help of some friars, Squanto apparently made it back to
He soon returned with another Indian named Squanto who spoke better English than Samoset.
The name Squanto has entered American history and folklore as the one of the last of the Patuxets who assisted the Pilgrims in 1620.
Squanto, as they called Tisquantum, showed them how to plant corn and fertilize the kernels with a fish, and otherwise increase their food production.
The Native Americans Samoset and Squanto befriended the colonists the following spring and taught them skills for survival in the new land.
Ten Pilgrims went on a short military expedition to protect Massasoit and their translator, Squanto, from threats by neighboring enemy villages (Heath 1963, 56-75).
Chapter 5 discusses what Hart calls cultural "go-betweens"--captives, renegades, and translators such as La Malinche and Jeronimo de Aguilar in the conquest of Mexico or Squanto in the Pilgrims dealings with the New England Indians--in order to suggest that the contact between Europeans and Native Americans was "not as one-sided as many might now think" (105).