St. Crispin's Day

St. Crispin's Day

October 25
According to legend, Crispin and his brother Crispinian traveled from Rome to the French town of Soissons, where they preached and earned a living as shoemakers, offering shoes to the poor at a very low price and using leather provided by angels. The people of Soissons built a church in their honor in the sixth century, and since that time they have been known as the patron saints of shoemakers and other workers in leather. People who wore shoes that were too tight were said to be "in St. Crispin's prison."
This is also the day on which the French and English armies fought the battle of Agincourt in the middle period of the Hundred Years War (1415). The association between the feast day and the battle is so strong that writers sometimes use "St. Crispin's Day" as an expression meaning "a time of battle" or "a time to fight." This day is also called the Feast of Crispian, St. Crispian's Day, Crispin's Day, Crispin Crispian, and the Day of Crispin Crispianus .
SOURCES:
BkDays-1864, vol. II, p. 492
BkHolWrld-1986, Oct 25
DaysCustFaith-1957, p. 267
DictDays-1988, p. 101
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 261
FestSaintDays-1915, p. 188
FolkWrldHol-1999, p. 600
OxYear-1999, p. 427
(c)
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