Stand Age

Stand Age

 

one of the basic valuational criteria which characterize a stand. Stands are divided into classes according to their age. For coniferous and hardleaved deciduous stands grown from seeds, 20-year age classes have been determined; for undergrowth and softleaved deciduous stands grown from seeds, ten-year age classes; and for species of brushwood, five-year age classes. A stand in which the ages of the trees vary within the limits of a single class is considered to be of the same age, whereas if the ages fall within several classes, the stand is considered to be of different ages. The ages of trees are determined by the number of annual layers (rings), as seen on the stumps of sample trees which have been cut down or on a cylinder of wood which is removed from the trunk of a growing tree by a special borer. Another method of determining the age of trees is by external criteria, such as the color of the needles, the form of the crown, and the color and structure of the bark.

References in periodicals archive ?
26] focused on the ant population ratio in natural forests and oil palm plantations, but she had not yet discussed how changes in ant communities in line with the development of peat land with different palm stand age.
The trajectory of a let-grow forest -- one that is not harvested but left to grow -- is based on the observed rate of live tree carbon by stand age.
The working hypotheses of the present research were that root and leaf adaptation strategies differ between tree species and stand age affects tree structure, and leaf and root morphology.
Mean stand age for each plot was retrieved from the FIA plot condition data and overall mean stand age and confidence interval was calculated.
The stand age was 16 years when the trees were selected for this study.
The species richness of these epiphytes did not appear to be related to stand age, as even the youngest stands (Kinguru and Rauda) supported six and five WKH indicator species, respectively, while the highest richness, observed at Pededze, was eight species.
This study determined the relationship of baldcypress stand age with litter production at Caddo Lake.
Pseudoreplication could also explain the apparently anomalous 50% reduction in below-ground biomass between the 12-15-year-old stand and the 25-year-old stand which, by implication, they attribute to stand age (their table 2) but could more easily be explained by environmental differences between sites (e.
The forest value growth percentage is calculated for each stand age.