star clouds


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Related to star clouds: Star clusters

star clouds

Areas of the sky where great numbers of stars are seen so close together that they appear as continuous irregular bright clouds. Star clouds are particularly noticeable in the direction of the galactic center in the constellation Sagittarius.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to NGC/IC researcher Harold Corwin, this can't be the object Guillaume Bigourdan discovered: "Bigourdan's measurements clearly point at IC 131's star clouds, his description fits them, and he specifically mentions the compact H II region calling it a 13.
LDN 548, representative of the large clouds in this region, is relatively easy to locate: it's on the north side of the Scutum Star Cloud, just 1/2[degrees] west of the stars 7 and 8 Aquilae and 8' from the star HD 174323.
The average observer doesn't associate this part of the sky with galaxy hunting, yet even near the Milky Way's star clouds you can find many fine examples.
Time-lapse nightscapes on a fixed tripod or a moving track will also benefit from the Rokinon's fast f/2 focal ratio--you'll record the star clouds and dust lanes of the Milky Way in shorter exposures, as well as some large, faint nebulae, particularly if you're shooting with a modified camera.
A similar approach works well when imaging galaxy clusters or star clouds within the Milky Way.
We're lucky that something as prosaic as a car ride can transport us to the awesome star clouds of our home galaxy.
The Milky Way from Sagittarius to Cygnus isn't merely a faint band of featureless haze; it's divided by a long dark rift, smudged by several dark patches, and ornamented by a half-dozen star clouds of different sizes and brightnesses.
But when seeking the last weeks to view the star clouds, nebulae, and clusters in the direction of our galaxy's center, you also have to take into account a phenomenon almost as legendary as the Milky Way itself: the Harvest Moon.
But it isn't a featureless, hazy band; it has bays, rifts, and star clouds that can be seen easily by the unaided eye and are often quite spectacular in binoculars -- as long as you view them from a dark location on a clear, moonless night.
Or the mist of star clouds thrown up from the unseen cataract?