Starlan


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Starlan

An early local area network from AT&T that used twisted pair wire, the CSMA/CD access method, transmitted at 1 Mbps and used a star or bus topology. In 1988, the original Starlan was renamed Starlan 1, and Starlan 10 was introduced as a 10 Mbps Ethernet product.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the topology of telephone wiring, StarLAN cables terminated at an electronic hub in an office telephone service closet.
In Local Area Networks, a hub is the core of a star as in ARCNET, StarLAN, Ethernet and Token Ring.
They also used an AT&T StarLAN solution and Structured Cabling System, marking the first time that this topology--and optical fiber--had been used in an industrial application in Hungary.
It works with any LAN operating system, including Novell NetWare, NFS, and Banyan VINES, over popular media including Ethernet, StarLAN, and TokenRing.
The equipment for the contest, provided by AT&T, included 45 Unix System V computers networked together to a StarServer E with StarLAN, which used TCPIP.
The Academic Network System runs on an AT&T Starlan network using Stargroup Server and Client software.
We supplied 6386/SX EL computers, StarLAN 10 network NAUs and hubs for access to a wide variety of electronic mail packages, including PMX/StarMAIL, AT&T Computer Systems' E-Mail offering LANs, and special programs of information about the show and a lead tracking facility.
Two UNIX-based AT&T 3B2 minicomputers and 10 AT&T 3B1 UNIX micros are networked together through a StarLan network.
AT&T also offers a new StarWAN 10:4 bridge, a StarLAN 10 Network EISA Network Access Unit, and general purpose synchronous controllers (GPSC) which provide low-cost synchronous communications from AT-and EISA-bus computers to SNA hosts or X.
The university's Wharton School, one of the most prestigious business schools in the world, has connected data devices at its new $30 million Steinberg Executive Education Conference Center through some 36 AT&T STARLAN local area network nodes.
Starlan can also serve as a gateway to AT&T's Information System Network, a larger general-purpose networking scheme that makes use of two-pair wiring, fiber-optic calbe and packet swtching to connect a wide variety of integrated voice/data systems, PCs, ASCII terminals and PBXs.
To provide another networking alternative, Xerox has reached an agreement with AT&T to market the hardware used in the low-cost AT&T Starlan Network, which uses the spare telephone wires already in place in many office buildings.