Stokes' law


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Stokes' law

[′stōks ‚lȯ]
(fluid mechanics)
At low velocities, the frictional force on a spherical body moving through a fluid at constant velocity is equal to 6π times the product of the velocity, the fluid viscosity, and the radius of the sphere.
(spectroscopy)
The wavelength of luminescence excited by radiation is always greater than that of the exciting radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with his academic adviser Thomas Thundat, who holds the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Oil Sands & Molecular Engineering, as well as Vakhtang Putkaradze, centennial professor of U of A's Department of Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Phani theoretically modelled the response, based on his experimental results, which showed a stark deviation from the age-old Stokes' law.
We attempted to compare empirically derived and predicted mussel feces settling velocity (measured in centimeters per second) data, but calculations of settling velocities using Stokes' law could not be carried out because of the noncompliance of the assumption requiring a low Reynolds number (the ratio of inertial to viscous force) Re > 0.
Several authors have gathered empirical data on density of feces, whereas others have attempted to use Stokes' law and Newton's second law to calculate and model settling velocities from inputs dictated by Komar et al.
The first terms in Equations 3 and 4 are the Stokes' law equation and the second term corrects for deviations from Stokes' law at higher [u.
Gravity settling, based on Stokes' Law, can be used to calculate settleable solids removal in the free settling zone (where particles fall independent of each other).
According to Stokes' Law, a spherical particle in stagnant fluid (moving under laminar flow conditions) will settle in the vertical direction and accelerate to a constant velocity known as the terminal or settling velocity.
The first is described by Stokes' Law and is referred to as "settling.