downburst

(redirected from Straight-line winds)
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Related to Straight-line winds: downburst, Macroburst

downburst

downburst
A local high-velocity downward movement of air mass flowing out of a thunderstorm. It is the chief cause of severe wind shear. The size of a downburst may vary from a ¼ mile to more than 10 miles. It can last from 5 to 30 minutes. The wind speed can go as high as 120 knots. It is potentially very dangerous, especially during the takeoff and landing phases.
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Federal funding is available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, straight-line winds and flooding in Johnson and Wyandotte counties.
The storms, which began on Wednesday, unleashed tornadoes and straight-line winds that overturned mobile homes and HGVs, uprooted trees and knocked down power lines across the South.
They came out of nowhere early one morning and within seconds, straight-line winds ripped the metal siding off the Maple Leaf Farms refrigerated distribution center, exposing racks of frozen duck entrees to the blustery spring morning.
Tornadoes and straight-line winds have different effects on buildings, Selvam said.
A structure located anywhere in the Midwest is more likely to be damaged by thunderstorm outflow straight-line winds than by a tornado.
But incredibly, the recreated oasis was soon smitten by straight-line winds that again left the garden in shambles.
Trump declared that a major disaster exists in the State of Kansas and ordered Federal assistance to supplement State and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding from July 22 to July 27, 2017.
1994), occasionally produce swaths of intense, straight-line winds (e.
Although property owners are most concerned with tornado damage, according to the NSSL, straight-line winds, as well as other types of winds, can potentially cause damage and typically produce more widespread damage than tornadoes.
In testing, the door demonstrated an ability to withstand pressures of +52 and -52 pounds per square foot and remain intact through straight-line winds and hurricanes.
The recent outbreaks of tornadoes, large hail and damaging straight-line winds in the United States have emphasized the importance of historical data analysis for insurers and reinsurers when trying to forecast future losses," said Adam Podlaha, head of Impact Forecasting with Aon Benfield, in the report.