straw bale

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straw bale

An agricultural by-product made from the stems of cereal crops, sugar cane, wheat, oats, rye, rice, barley, and others. Low cost and general availability make straw bales a highly desirable, natural green material. A post-and-beam framework is the most common non-load-bearing construction method, where the framework supports the structure and straw bales are used as infill. Straw bale is a very economical material, but it must be protected from getting wet both during and after construction. See also: Biomaterials
References in periodicals archive ?
Strawbale is going to be a community cafe, farm shop, classrooms and kitchen.
Bill and Athena Steen, a couple committed to educating people about sustainable ways of living, along with an architect who consults on strawbale homes, offer practical guidance on building simple, energy- efficient structures including fences, outbuildings, greenhouses, and houses.
See examples of strawbale, cob, earth, and lime plasters.
From strawbale walls to interior finishing, Living Homes provides a gold mine of construction specifics for any neophyte builder.
The Strawbale Building Registry at Sustainable Sources: thelaststraw.
The above quote from Alternative Wall Systems for Low-Rise Housing a Research Highlights document, Technical Series 02-132, from CMHC, is quite informative for the following construction methods: lightweight steel framing, structural insulated panels, insulated concrete forms, post and beam, concrete block, log, stackwall, strawbale, manufactured wood wall, and earth wall construction.
Residents live in strawbale houses, and all utilities are powered by the sun and wind.
The students relied on strawbale construction, which the Crow people used in times past.
Brigid, we shall call her, ran the Tir Nan Og Light Centre on the south end of the island and communed in solitary splendor in her strawbale house with a host of nature spirits, including fairies, gnomes, sprites, zephyrs, salamanders, and the Green Man, Pan.
Presents stories of owner builders from around Australia who have used the Strawbale technique to construct their homes.
Inner-city restoration and contaminated "brownfield" sites aren't likely to adapt as easily to strawbale homes or sustainable gardens.
Strawbale construction is generally cheaper per square foot to build, cheaper to heat or cool because of its superior insulation properties and cheaper to repair due to its lower-tech construction.