river engineering

(redirected from Stream channelization)

river engineering

[′riv·ər ‚en·jə‚nir·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
A branch of transportation engineering consisting of the physical measures which are taken to improve a river and its banks.

River engineering

A branch of civil engineering that involves the control and utilization of rivers for the benefit of humankind. Its scope includes river training, channel design, flood control, water supply, navigation improvement, hydraulic structure design, hazard mitigation, and environmental enhancement. River engineering is also necessary to provide protection against floods and other river disasters. The emphasis is often on river responses, long-term and short-term, to changes in nature, and stabilization and utilization, such as damming, channelization, diversion, bridge construction, and sand or gravel mining. Evaluation of river responses is essential at the conceptual, planning, and design phases of a project and requires the use of fundamental principles of river and sedimentation engineering. See Canal, Dam

References in periodicals archive ?
miniatus (Smith, 1979), has experienced a drastic range reduction due to stream channelization, drainage of wetlands, and oil pollution (Smith, 1979; Taylor et al.
Likewise, stream channelization and loss of riparian buffer zones increase current velocity and water temperature (Walser and Bart, 1999; Talmage et al.
Destruction and modification of riparian habitats have been caused mainly by water diversions and ground-water pumping, dam and stream channelization, clearing of vegetation, livestock overgrazing, disruption of the natural hydrologic cycle, and the introduction of non-native plants.
Destruction and modification of riparian habitats have been caused mainly by water diversions and groundwater pumping, dam and stream channelization, clearing of vegetation, livestock overgrazing, disruption of the natural hydrologic cycle, and the introduction of non-native plants.
Because of widespread stream channelization and resulting massive channel erosion and incision, most streams in north-central Mississippi today are characterized by highly unstable sand substrates and extremely flashy hydrographs (Adams et al.
Crayfish are susceptible to habitat damage caused by impoundments, stream channelization, pollution, and sedimentation.
The species declined due to exotic fish competition and predation, water diversion, stream channelization, groundwater pumping, and water pollution.
Most of the Topeka shiner's decline is linked to habitat degradation in the form of increased sedimentation from accelerated soil runoff, stream channelization, tributary impoundments, and excessive water removal for irrigation.