streamflow

(redirected from Stream flow)

streamflow

[′strēm‚flō]
(hydrology)
A type of channel flow, applied to surface runoff moving in a stream.
References in classic literature ?
This broad but shallow stream flows for an immense distance through a wide and verdant valley scooped out of boundless prairies.
Their father was a rich man who lived in the strong city of Phere and was descended from the river Alpheus, whose broad stream flows through the land of the Pylians.
Here a yellow stream flows from rotted moose- hide sacks and sinks into the ground, with long grasses growing through it and vegetable mould overrunning it and hiding its yellow from the sun; and here he muses for a time, howling once, long and mournfully, ere he departs.
While plentiful rains in June replenished reservoirs, stream flow and ground water sources, very dry, warm weather in July and August resulted in high water usage that has continued into September.
As for Kotri barrage it was said the situation was normal with up stream flow coming to 139050 cusec and down-stream 129645 cusec.
The city may get relief in June, however, when the water right for the in-stream flow for fish is reduced to reflect historically lower stream flows during the dry weather.
CDB's board of directors also approved a grant of US$221,000 to cover the cost of equipment for rainfall and stream flow measurement, and training of hydrological technicians.
Construction of the Upper Naryn Cascade hydropower plants will not affect stream flow generation processes of the Naryn and Syr Darya rivers (running through the territory of Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan), since stream flow regulation won't be used in dams of the cascade, RusHydro, project implementer, said in a statement concerning hydropower cooperation with Kyrgyzstan.
Instead, SWMI focuses solely on regulating and limiting water withdrawals from groundwater and surface waters like Worcester's to ostensibly improve stream flow and the aquatic habitat for fluvial fish.
These paired watersheds are within 3 miles of each other, and are two of four watersheds at SFREC that we have been monitoring for stream flow and water quality.
Initially, the general observations that were procured led to our hypothesis that the bacteria thrive in areas that have low water depth, a low stream flow rate, low dissolved oxygen level, near neutral pH levels, and high ferrous iron levels.
The hydrological 'super-modelling' project will provide information on current and likely future water yield, taking into account the impact of climate change and other risks, in a part of Australia where winter rainfall has declined by about 15 per cent, and corresponding stream flow by over 50 per cent, since 1976.