streamflow

(redirected from Stream flow)

streamflow

[′strēm‚flō]
(hydrology)
A type of channel flow, applied to surface runoff moving in a stream.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said water with less than 20 percent lahar was considered a flood or stream flow.
The projects included 'Interaction of westerly and summer monsoon in upper Indus basin and its impact on water resources' and 'Projection and attribution of stream flow composition in Mountain Rivers in China and Pakistan'.
Tenders are invited for purchase of stream flow meters flange type 50 mm 76 mm and 101 mm for measuring the stream flow rate at verka amritsar dairy
The author covers land use and land cover classification, the mapping of evotranspiration using MODIS and SEBA, the modeling of stream flow using the STREAM model, water productivity, and a wide variety of other related issues.
The city may get relief in June, however, when the water right for the in-stream flow for fish is reduced to reflect historically lower stream flows during the dry weather.
The placement of these gauges allows for real-time information about water levels and stream flow to be delivered to the landowners.
Construction of the Upper Naryn Cascade hydropower plants will not affect stream flow generation processes of the Naryn and Syr Darya rivers (running through the territory of Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan), since stream flow regulation won't be used in dams of the cascade, RusHydro, project implementer, said in a statement concerning hydropower cooperation with Kyrgyzstan.
Instead, SWMI focuses solely on regulating and limiting water withdrawals from groundwater and surface waters like Worcester's to ostensibly improve stream flow and the aquatic habitat for fluvial fish.
For this study, wet and dry events were defined as a function of both stream flow and precipitation.
These paired watersheds are within 3 miles of each other, and are two of four watersheds at SFREC that we have been monitoring for stream flow and water quality.
Initially, the general observations that were procured led to our hypothesis that the bacteria thrive in areas that have low water depth, a low stream flow rate, low dissolved oxygen level, near neutral pH levels, and high ferrous iron levels.
The hydrological 'super-modelling' project will provide information on current and likely future water yield, taking into account the impact of climate change and other risks, in a part of Australia where winter rainfall has declined by about 15 per cent, and corresponding stream flow by over 50 per cent, since 1976.