Strickland, William

Strickland, William,

1788–1854, American architect of the classic revival, b. Navesink, New Jersey. He studied under B. H. Latrobe. In his buildings Strickland sought to reconcile the proportions of ancient architecture with modern utilitarian needs. He worked mostly in Philadelphia, where in 1818 he won the competition for the Second Bank of the United States (later the customhouse, now a historical site) and superintended its construction (1819–24). His most distinctive building is the Merchants' Exchange (1832–34) in Philadelphia, a significant work in the classical style. In 1828 he restored the steeple of Independence Hall. A late work was the state capitol at Nashville, Tenn.

Bibliography

See study by A. Gilchrist (1950).

Strickland, William

(1788–1854)
American architect. A pupil of Latrobe; designed mostly in the Greek Revival style, as well as the Egyptian Revival style.

Strickland, William

(1788–1854) architect, engineer; born in Navesink, N.J. He apprenticed with Benjamin Latrobe and also became a skilled artist, engraver, and engineer. He launched the Greek revival in America with a series of Philadelphia public buildings in the 1820s and 1830s, notably the Second Bank of the United States (1818–24); he completed public engineering projects including the Delaware Breakwater (1828–40); and he was designer and supervising architect of the Tennessee State Capitol, Nashville (1845–59).
References in periodicals archive ?
This year's scholarship recipients were: Emily Erkkinen (O'Toole), Laury Fouche, Paul Zapantis, Patrick Rodgers, Ryan Newell, Ashley Trautner, Jessica Strickland, William Connolly, Helen Kerrigan and Kelsey Kilcoyne.