Stubble Plow

Stubble Plow

 

a farm implement for the surface plowing of soil. There are two types of stubble plows: disc and share.

The disc stubble plow consists of a frame with support wheels and individual sections each having between eight and ten spherical discs. When the plow is operated, the turning discs loosen the soil and partially turn it over. Ballast boxes are secured to the sections to increase the load on the discs and deepen the tillage. Secured to the beam of the plow frame by hinges, the sections can conform easily to the relief of the field. The sections are set at an angle (the angle of attack) to the line of movement of the plow. Stubble plows may have a fixed or adjustable angle of attack. After a pass of a correctly adjusted plow the field has a small-lump top layer with ridges not more than 8 cm high and with all weeds undercut.

The share stubble plow is used to break up stubble in fields that have been infested by sucker-type weeds (such as sowthistle and bindweed) and for layered tillage of clean fallow. These plows may be towed or mounted. The towed plow consists of a frame with support wheels to which are attached shanks with trapezoidal shares, digger moldboards, and grassboards. The wheels have screw or lever lifting mechanisms to regulate the depth of tillage and the angle of the frame relative to the horizontal plane during operation.

The depth of soil tillage by a mounted stubble plow is changed by setting the support wheel at different elevations.

Brief descriptions of the plows produced in the USSR are given in Table 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
On the other end of the spectrum is the stubble plow, which partially turns under grain stubble while pulverizing the soil.