subsistence farming

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subsistence farming

[səb¦sis·təns ¦färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Growth of crops predominantly for consumption by the farm family rather than for sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Tanzania, more than 1,000 households on the slopes of Kilimanjaro were interviewed to understand how climate change affected subsistence agriculture.
This is consistent with the finding mentioned above that subsistence agriculture is less risky than off-farm employment.
Farming, mostly small scale subsistence agriculture, is the chief source of employment in Morocco despite reforms aimed at expanding the role of manufacturing and services.
Mandelson cited the determination of India, and other countries where millions depend on subsistence agriculture, to hold out for stronger safeguards against farm imports.
In the 1970s, Sudan's agricultural sector shifted from one based in subsistence agriculture to one focused on export crops.
The dike will wash out a few times a year, taking money and labor away from cultivation and harvesting of crops, further hurting the subsistence agriculture of the region.
Over time, Victor moves from frustration in teaching "savages" the value of subsistence agriculture, saying, "Poor school
In an ambiguous system where capitalist enterprise often coexists with non capitalist forms of production, the vast majority of Cameroon women find themselves at the lowest levels in the occupational hierarchy mainly in areas of subsistence agriculture petty commodity production, petty commerce and mainly low-level clerical jobs.
His preference, famously, was the nunchaku, a weapon of wood and rope with origins in the tools of Asian subsistence agriculture.
They are overwhelmingly concentrated in subsistence agriculture.
Working with the director of the division would be a 24-member standing council of advisors made up of 12 scientists and 12 stakeholders (representatives of farm organizations and industry, and "persons knowledgeable about the environment, subsistence agriculture, energy and human health").
Back then, the world of the Amish was one where subsistence agriculture, folk art, and intimate communities--all on the wane in most parts of the country--continued to thrive, a place where technology, money, consumerism, industry, and big government were absent by cultural and spiritual decree.