Suiyuan


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Suiyuan

(swā`yüän`), former province (c.126,000 sq mi/326,340 sq km), N China. The capital was Guisui (Hohhot). The region of Suiyuan, part of Inner Mongolia, is chiefly a high arid plateau; it comprises the Ordos desert region in the southwest, grazing areas in the north, and a fertile belt along the Huang He (Yellow River), which crosses Suiyuan from west to east. Livestock raising and the growing of grains, chiefly wheat, support most of the people. Several roads and a railroad to Beijing provide communications with E China. Suiyuan was overrun (1937) by the Japanese, who included it in Monjiang (Mongol Border Land). In 1954 it was made part of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to the flexibility of Chinese ideographs, yuan has transformed into a folk concept through a set of linguistic expressions elaborating different aspects of interpersonal encounters: sense of connectedness, youyuan [having yuan], wuyuan [having no yuan], or touyuan [match yuan]; extent of involvement, yuanshen [deep yuan] or yuanqian [shallow yuan]; quality of association, shanyuan [virtuous yuan] or eryuan [bad yuan]; attitude toward association, xiyuan [cherish yuan], suiyuan [follow yuan], and so on.
In his Suiyuan shihua [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], a poet and critic Yuan Mei [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1716-1798) insisted that "Luoy-ang paper became expensive" only because people wanted to use the "Rhapsody on the Three Capitals" as an encyclopedia (Lei 1974: 13-14):
sweet or annual wormwood, family Asteraceae) is an annual herb endemic to the northern parts of Chahar and Suiyuan provinces in China where it is known as 'quinghao' (green herb) and it has been used to treat chills and fever for more than 2000 years (Klayman, 1985; Hien and White, 1993).