Suppiluliumas

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Suppiluliumas,

fl. 14th cent. B.C., Hittite king (1390–54 B.C.). The greatest statesman-warrior in Hittite history, he left on his death an empire that was stronger, though not richer, than Egypt. He conspired with many of the vassals of IkhnatonIkhnaton
or Akhenaton
[Egyptian,=Aton is satisfied], d. c.1354 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (c.1372–1354 B.C.), of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Amenhotep III. His name at his accession was Amenhotep IV, but he changed it to honor the god Aton.
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, the Egyptian pharoah, urging them to revolt and seize Egyptian territory. He seized Egypt's possessions north of Palestine without incurring any resistance. His machinations brought about an international revolution and signaled the beginning of the end of Egyptian power.

Suppiluliumas

 

In the Hittite empire:

Suppiluliumas I. First ruler of the New Kingdom; reigned from 1380 B.C. to 1340 B.C. After an extensive war, Suppiluliumas subjugated the kingdom of Mitanni and made the king of Ugarit his vassal. The sons of Suppiluliumas ruled the Syrian states of Halab (Aleppo) and Carchemish.

Suppiluliumas II. The last ruler of the New Kingdom; reigned from 1190 B.C. to 1180 B.C.

References in periodicals archive ?
It had been conquered when Suppiluliuma I took Syria from the Mittannian empire and--not too long before the battle and after the crushing of a rebellion--had had a king, Niqmaddu, installed by Mursili II.
This is immediately followed by reference to the voluntary submission of Aziru, the great-great-grandfather of Sausgamuwa, to Suppiluliuma I, the great-grandfather of Tudhaliya IV ("Aziru came to .
The fact that Talmi-Sarrumma belonged to the Hittite royal family, having been the grandson of Suppiluliuma I, accounts for the difference.
132 (CTH 45), a letter of Suppiluliuma I to Niqmaddu.
I reject the common allegation that before Niqmaddu had submitted to Suppiluliuma I Ugarit had been subordinate to Egypt.
Thus there is good reason to assume that the treaty drawn up for Niqmaddu II of Ugarit by Suppiluliuma I, the full version of which has not reached us, did not include a military obligation.
In the work under review, Heinrich Otten presents a preliminary discussion of the new glyptic material of the great kings and their queens (in particular, of Arnuwanda I, Suppiluliuma I, Mursili III/Urhi-Tessup, Hattusili III, Puduhepa, and Tudhaliya IV, as well as of Ini-Tessup of Carchemish).
The most notable historical advances are the confirmation that Suppiluliuma I was indeed the son of Tudhaliya III (pp.