Swamp, marsh, and bog

Swamp, marsh, and bog

Wet flatlands, where mesophytic vegetation is a really more important than open water, which are commonly developed in filled lakes, glacial pits and potholes, or poorly drained coastal plains or floodplains. Swamp is a term usually applied to a wetland where trees and shrubs are an important part of the vegetative association, and bog implies lack of solid foundation. Some bogs consist of a thick zone of vegetation floating on water.

Unique plant associations characterize wetlands in various climates and exhibit marked zonation characteristics around the edge in response to different thicknesses of the saturated zone above the firm base of soil material. Coastal marshes covered with vegetation adapted to saline water are common on all continents. Presumably many of these had their origin in recent inundation due to post-Pleistocene rise in sea level. See Mangrove