Swansea

(redirected from Swansea, United Kingdom)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Swansea

(swŏn`zē, –sē), Welsh Abertawe, city (1981 pop. 172,433) and county, 146 sq mi (378 sq km), S Wales. Located on Swansea Bay at the mouth of the Tawe River, the city of Swansea is a metallurgical center with sheet-metal mills, foundries, and smelting works. Other industries are engineering, shipbuilding, and oil refining (at the suburb Llandarcy). Crude oil, metals, timber, grain, and rubber are imported. Swansea ware, of rich blue coloring with decorative painting, was made at the Swansea potteries in the first half of the 19th cent. Swansea Museum and a medieval castle on the site of an old ruined Norman castle are points of special interest. Swansea Univ. and Swansea Metropolitan Univ. are there. The poet Dylan ThomasThomas, Dylan
, 1914–53, Welsh poet, b. Swansea. An extraordinarily individualistic writer, Thomas is ranked among the great 20th-century poets. He grew up in Swansea, the son of a teacher, but left school at 17 to become a journalist and moved to London two years later.
..... Click the link for more information.
 was born in Swansea.

Swansea

(swŏn`zē), town (1990 est. pop. 15,500), Bristol co., SE Mass., a suburb of Fall RiverFall River,
industrial city (1990 pop. 92,703), Bristol co., SE Mass., a port of entry on Mt. Hope Bay, at the mouth of the Taunton River; settled 1656, set off from Freetown 1803, inc. as a city 1854.
..... Click the link for more information.
, on an inlet of Mount Hope Bay; founded 1667, inc. 1785. Once a vast farmland, it has become chiefly residential. Many of its inhabitants were massacred in King Philip's WarKing Philip's War,
1675–76, the most devastating war between the colonists and the Native Americans in New England. The war is named for King Philip, the son of Massasoit and chief of the Wampanoag. His Wampanoag name was Metacom, Metacomet, or Pometacom.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (1675), but the town was later rebuilt and prospered.

Swansea

 

a city in Great Britain, in southern Wales, in West Glamorgan County. Situated on the Bristol Channel, at the mouth of the Tawe River. Population, 189,800(1974). Swansea is a port near the South Wales coalfield. It is a major industrial center for nonferrous metallurgy, mainly the production of zinc and zinc alloys; there is a nickel refinery in the nearby city of Clydach. Swansea also has ferrous metallurgy and the chemical, machine-building, and electrical-engineering industries.

Swansea

1. a port in S Wales, in Swansea county on an inlet of the Bristol Channel (Swansea Bay); a metallurgical and oil-refining centre; university (1920). Pop.: 169 880 (2001)
2. a county of S Wales on the Bristol Channel, created in 1996 from part of West Glamorgan: includes the Swansea conurbation and the Gower peninsula. Administrative centre: Swansea. Pop.: 224 600 (2003 est.). Area: 378 sq. km (146 sq. miles)