otitis externa

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otitis externa

[ō′tīd·əs ek′stər·nə]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the external ear.
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Combined with increased sweating in higher temperatures, the peaking popularity of earbud use has caused an uptick in swimmer's ear in runners.
For instance, you don't usually get swimmer's ear from taking baths or showers.
Swimmer's ear usually causes itchiness but it is always best to avoid scratching the ear as this often makes the infection worse.
Swimmer's ear is characterized by pain, tenderness, redness, and swelling of the external ear canal.
Swimmer's ear, a condition formally called acute otitis externa, is an infection of the outer ear and ear canal, often resulting from water becoming trapped in the ear.
Consider buying over-the-counter eardrops to use after swimming to help prevent swimmer's ear.
Some children are more likely to get swimmer's ear than others.
His first swim had to be postponed: just as I had lined up someone to teach him how to maneuver in water, we discovered that he had swimmer's ear, which meant he had to keep his ears away from water.
Among the conditions that can be treated by virtuwell are: Sinus infections, bladder infections, pink eye, the flu, upper respiratory infections, yeast infection, ear pain, allergies, bronchitis, acne, poison ivy/poison oak, rashes, diaper rash, first and second degree burns, sunburn, swimmer's ear and lice.
Swimmer's ear often develops after swimming because persistent moisture within the ear canal increases the risk of infection.
Custom hearing protection is available for many types of activities: From musicians ear plugs, motorcycle ear plugs made to go under helmets, swimming ear plugs to protect from cold water and swimmer's ear infections, hunting/shooter's ear molds, and custom earmolds for occupational hearing protection.
A IT sounds like you have swimmer's ear or otitis externa.