Swiss Plateau


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Swiss Plateau

 

(also Mittelland), a plateau in Switzerland, between the Alps and the Jura. The Swiss Plateau extends 240 km, from Lake Geneva to Bodensee (Lake Constance), and is approximately 50 km wide. Elevations decrease from 1,000–1,200 m (maximum elevation, 1,408 m at Mount Napf) in the southeast to 400–500 m in the northwest. The plateau has a hilly relief with numerous lakes. On the Swiss Plateau are fields, orchards, and tracts of oak, ash, and beech forest.

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With modules covering around 10,000 square metres, the systems are among the largest in the Swiss plateau.
The systems at the HEnrkingen site are among the largest in the Swiss plateau.
Another clue to understanding the Swiss historical mindset is in its Latin title (Confoederatio Helvetica, or Helvetic Confederation), named after the earliest-known settlers on the Swiss plateau, the Helvetii, whose supremacy was dislodged by Julius Caesar.
The railway very quickly became Switzerland's most important means of transport Over the next 50-60 years, tracks would be laid every where: across the Swiss plateau, up the side of mountains--the first of which was the rack-railway reaching the peak of the 5,906-foot high Mount Rigi in central Switzerland-and, with the construction of tunnels, through a number of mountains, most notably the mammoth 15-kilometer project through St.
The invasion was welcomed by some subject peoples in Switzerland as a long overdue liberation from the `tyranny' of oligarchic city-republics such as Bern which had conquered much of the Swiss plateau in the sixteenth century.
Conventional and Catholic Lucerne was faced by a rising tide of radical politicians anxious to further economic innovation on the Swiss plateau.

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