Syncarpy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Syncarpy

 

in angiospermous plants, a type of carpel concrescence. In syncarpy the lateral surfaces of the carpels grow together and form septa in the gynoecium, which divide the cavity of the gynoecium into chambers. The number of chambers corresponds to the number of carpels.

Syncarpy may be complete or partial. For example, in plants of the family Trochodendronidae and some members of the family Crassulaceae the stylodia and the upper parts of the gynoecium remain free (hemisyncarpy). In plants of the family Hypericaceae and some members of the family Caryophyllaceae the carpels fuse together completely in the gynoecium, and only the stylodia remain free. In gamopetalous dicotyledons, such as Ericaceae and Campanulaceae, and in most monocotyledons the concrescence includes the entire gynoecium, which consists of a syncarpous gynoecium and one style ending in the stigma. In some plants of the families Caryophyllaceae and Scrophulariaceae there is complete syncarpy only at the base of the gynoecium; in the upper part there is lysicarpy (hemilysicarpy) or paracarpy (hemiparacarpy).