Synge


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Synge

John Millington. 1871--1909, Irish playwright. His plays, marked by vivid colloquial Irish speech, include Riders to the Sea (1904) and The Playboy of the Western World, produced amidst uproar at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, in 1907
References in periodicals archive ?
d] is a characteristic of the PV model of the vacuum state, and is related to the Synge primitive (planewave) quantization of spacetime to be discussed below.
He goes about the answer by first surveying the written record left by visitors from the late eighteenth century up to Synge himself.
O'Connor's descriptions of the vanished Dublin and Wicklow of Synge and Molly's quarrelsome, affectionate courtship are enchanting.
In his introduction, he discusses Irish poets naming his "Ascendency" partners, Lady Gregory and John Synge, but also mentioning Padraic Colum, Joseph Campbell, Frank O'Connor and James Stephens; Yeats specifically notes their work with Irish "folk tradition" (xiii).
Like so many other perennially broke Irish writers in the first quarter of the 20th century, Synge preferred to live in Paris rather than Dublin.
Synge recibio la influencia determinante de su compatriota William Butler Yeats cuando vivian en Paris, el cual lo estimulo a entregarse a la literatura y buscar material para su trabajo en los desolados parajes de las islas de Aran, en la costa oeste de Irlanda.
Richard Hannon, for landing a one-two in the nursery with King Supreme and Synge Street
According to available sources, Synge became known to Hungarian literati in the 1920s.
The plays of Synge, seen at one sitting, speak to one another: together, they make up a portrait not only of an artist but of a culture and a world.
Romantic pastoral was a formative part of the Literary Revival from the beginning: urban writers rejecting metropolitan life ('Give up Paris', Yeats told Synge, 'Go to the Aran Islands'), renewing themselves 'Antaeus-like' by contact with the soil, by escape into the otherness of the West.
Although his choice of Synge, O'Casey, and Beckett is made for reasons of contrast as well as comparison, all three dramatists under consideration, just as they react against the mythic values of the Celtic Revival, react against the sort of ritualistic mythology that transforms failure into success.
Synge borrowed the plot from an Irish legend, The Fate of the Children of Uisneach.