Synge


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Synge

John Millington. 1871--1909, Irish playwright. His plays, marked by vivid colloquial Irish speech, include Riders to the Sea (1904) and The Playboy of the Western World, produced amidst uproar at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, in 1907
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He goes about the answer by first surveying the written record left by visitors from the late eighteenth century up to Synge himself.
He said that Synge had given a purely literary impression of the islands.
O'Connor's descriptions of the vanished Dublin and Wicklow of Synge and Molly's quarrelsome, affectionate courtship are enchanting.
People want success without excess, and when Synge and MacKenna lend and return to each other they had better do it in cash that actually buys something, rather than IOUs.
6) The 1925 production of Synge by Forgach's theater is remembered as a pioneer venture.
The plays of Synge, seen at one sitting, speak to one another: together, they make up a portrait not only of an artist but of a culture and a world.
Romantic pastoral was a formative part of the Literary Revival from the beginning: urban writers rejecting metropolitan life ('Give up Paris', Yeats told Synge, 'Go to the Aran Islands'), renewing themselves 'Antaeus-like' by contact with the soil, by escape into the otherness of the West.
Mishkin's discussion of the representation of literary Irish "folk" voices by John Synge and other Irish writers, follo wed by a similar consideration of black writers and their approaches to the recreation of voices of African American folk subjects, is particularly helpful to thinking about the debates about literary language in both movements and possible cross-currents between the two sets of debates.
John Millington Synge, in his writings on the Aran Islands about 100 years ago, made the remark that the islanders were poor people, but in the whole course of their daily lives they didn't touch anything that wasn't beautiful.
There are those who write in one language of another, Synge being the exemplar.
Writers such as Synge reacted against the colonialist derogation of Irish dialect - a derogation particularly prominent in the "stage Irishman" - and showed the beauty and gravity of Hiberno-English speech patterns.
Synge (on whom she had written an article) as well as Oscar Wilde: Salome for the ornate imagery, and his comedies for some of the lighter plays included here (Little Drops of Rain, Two Ladies Take Tea).