Syntagmatic Relations

Syntagmatic Relations

 

the links and dependencies between linguistic elements (units of any complexity) that coexist simultaneously in a linear series (a text or speech). Syntagmatic relations may exist between neighboring sounds, resulting in vowel harmony and assimilation, and between morphs, resulting in superposition or truncation of adjacent morphemes. The term was introduced by F. de Saussure.

The term “syntagmatic relations” often refers to the concept of functions in consecutively joined linguistic elements in the speech process. Syntagmatic relations, which are in contrast to paradigmatic relations, or associative links, constitute the area of study known as syntagmatics. The analysis of linguistic phenomena solely by their syntagmatic relations was typical of descriptive linguistics and was the basis for distributive analysis.

The study of syntagmatic relations is an important aspect of the problem of the combinability of linguistic elements, their valence, and the principles regulating their ability to combine in speech.

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Sahlgren has specified the distributional hypothesis, stating that if a distributional model based on co-occurrence frequencies reflects the syntagmatic relations of words, a comparison of the collocates should reveal information on their paradigmatic relations (Sahlgren 2008:7).
The relationships of paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations are visualized by the nearest neighbour position of antonomous words.
Syntagmatic relations are extracted on the analysis of terms collocations frequency or using syntactic information (for French): Zellig (Habert and Fabre 1999), N.
Syntagmatic relation patterns around verbs (1) Verb (SN1, SN2)--viewpoint: topic--scope Avoid (mounting and unmounting, gaiter damage)-- topic << problem if scope >> << domain >>* Link (camshaft pivot, reaming hub)--topic << solution >> scope << domain >>* Determine (functional analysis, dimension constraints) --topic << system parameters >> scope << planification >>* *translated from french
Because Watt argues that the novel of formal realism features a specific selection of elements embedded in a particular kind of ordering structure, I often recruit the structuralist premises of paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations to help students comprehend the potential expansiveness of his theoretical design.
The "words," "phrases," and "sentences" that form individual document descriptions and express the combinatory, syntagmatic relations between single terms captured by the system's NLP-based text-processing apparatus; * The "classificatory" structure over the document file as a whole that indicates the paradigmatic relations between terms and allows controlled-term substitution in NLP-based indexing and searching; and * The system's NLP-based mechanisms for searching and matching.
Given that they are themselves syntactically independent and complete, they cannot contract syntagmatic relations that are dictated by categories of sentence grammar.