mastocytosis

(redirected from Systemic mastocytosis)
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mastocytosis

[¦mas·tə‚sī′tō·səs]
(medicine)
Excessive mast cell proliferation. Also known as mast-cell disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A total serum tryptase level >20 ng/ml indicates one of the minor criteria for systemic mastocytosis.
8) showed the effect of omalizumab in a 15-year-old female patient who was diagnosed as having idiopathic anaphylaxis because of systemic mastocytosis.
26) A comparison of the features of MPN with PDGFRA rearrangement and systemic mastocytosis with eosinophilia (SM-EO) is presented in Table 4.
Response rates were similar regardless of the subtype of advanced systemic mastocytosis, KIT mutation status, or exposure to previous therapy," reported Jason R.
Patterns of skeletal scintigraphy and their relationship to plasma and urinary histamine levels in systemic mastocytosis.
It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Systemic Mastocytosis and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.
These include disuse atrophy, acute inflammatory atrophy associated with trauma (Sudeck's atrophy or algodystrophy), primary and metastatic tumours, hyperparathyroidism, gout, congenital pseudarthrosis, granulomatous diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, psoriatic arthritis, osteomyelitis, systemic mastocytosis, aseptic necrosis, neurogenic arthropathy, prolonged steroid therapy, bony aneurysm, and cystic angiomatous of bone.
Disseminated cutaneous mast cell tumors with epitheliotropism and systemic mastocytosis in a domestic cat.
The disease is classified into cutaneous mastocytosis (CM) where the infiltrates are within the skin, and systemic mastocytosis (SM) involving extracutaneous organs and bone marrow.
From the case report by Weingarten, Volcheck and Sprung of a reaction to intravenous contrast in a patient with systemic mastocytosis (1), it is not clear that the reaction described was anaphyalactoid as suggested.
The phenomenon of endogenously produced heparin-like anticoagulants has been previously described, but is typically associated with hematological malignancies, such as multiple myeloma, chronic lymphoid leukemia, T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and systemic mastocytosis.

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