torch


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Related to torch: TORCH Test

torch

1. a small portable electric lamp powered by one or more dry batteries
2. any apparatus that burns with a hot flame for welding, brazing, or soldering

torch

[tȯrch]
(building construction)
To apply lime mortar under the top edges of roof tiles or slates.
(engineering)
A gas burner used for brazing, cutting, or welding.
References in classic literature ?
Doubtless a wealth of material of historic interest here," said Professor Bumper, flashing his torch on the skeletons.
An order very similar to that adopted in the preceding interview was observed; the aged and superior chiefs occupying the area of the spacious apartment, within the powerful light of a glaring torch, while their juniors and inferiors were arranged in the background, presenting a dark outline of swarthy and marked visages.
Pass that torch slowly along these walls, that I may see them," said Defarge to the turnkey.
In easy state upon this couch, there sat a jolly Giant, glorious to see:, who bore a glowing torch, in shape not unlike Plenty's horn, and held it up, high up, to shed its light on Scrooge, as he came peeping round the door.
Here is that which will give us light," said Galazi, and one man of every two took a torch and lit it at a fire that burned near the mouth of the cave.
As the Palmer, lighted by a domestic with a torch, past through the intricate combination of apartments of this large and irregular mansion, the cupbearer coming behind him whispered in his ear, that if he had no objection to a cup of good mead in his apartment, there were many domestics in that family who would gladly hear the news he had brought from the Holy Land, and particularly that which concerned the Knight of Ivanhoe.
Bring a torch, Dick," said Silver when my capture was thus assured.
The Renaissance knew of strange manners of poisoning-- poisoning by a helmet and a lighted torch, by an embroidered glove and a jewelled fan, by a gilded pomander and by an amber chain.
He would get his torch and wave it, and yell with the best.
A burning torch lay on the ground near the first man whom the mule had thrown, by the light of which Don Quixote perceived him, and coming up to him he presented the point of the lance to his face, calling on him to yield himself prisoner, or else he would kill him; to which the prostrate man replied, "I am prisoner enough as it is; I cannot stir, for one of my legs is broken: I entreat you, if you be a Christian gentleman, not to kill me, which will be committing grave sacrilege, for I am a licentiate and I hold first orders.
Then a torch was brought, and the wood, heavily soaked with oil, instantly took fire.
The door opened, and a dim light reached Dantes' eyes through the coarse sack that covered him; he saw two shadows approach his bed, a third remaining at the door with a torch in its hand.