Tahoe National Forest


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Tahoe National Forest

Address:631 Coyote St
Nevada City, CA 95959

Phone:530-265-4531
Fax:530-478-6109
Web: www.fs.fed.us/r5/tahoe
Size: 845,094 acres.
Location:In the North Central Sierra Nevada Range, between Lake Tahoe and the Sacramento Valley. Accessible by US 80 and CA 89. Nearby cities/towns include Downieville, Nevada City, and Sierra City.
Facilities:Visitor center, 77 campgrounds, 12 group camps, dispersed camping, 20 picnic sites, 4 resorts, boat ramps, trail, ORV areas, 5 downhill ski areas, snowshoeing, shooting range, scenic drives.
Activities:Camping, hunting, fishing, boating, whitewater rafting, canoeing, swimming, water-skiing, hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, rock climbing, cross-country and downhill skiing, snowmobiling, gold panning.
Special Features:Northern end of California's Gold Country; elevations range from 1,500 feet, around the golden foothills on the western slope, to the 9,400-foot high peaks of the Sierra crest. Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail; North Fork of the American River, a Wild and Scenic river; three forks of the Yuba River; excellent fishing at Jackson Meadows and Stampede reservoirs; historic sites from the Donner Party, including petroglyphs, the Gold Rush era, and prehistoric Native Americans.

See other parks in California.
References in periodicals archive ?
2013) examined how well Lidar data could estimate them in the Tahoe National Forest.
Forest health, resiliency, and wildlife habitat in Tahoe National Forest will benefit from more than 26,000 ponderosa pine, jack pine, sugar pine, Douglas-fir, and incense cedar planted after a wildfire there.
Information: Tahoe Truckee Sports, (916) 587-9000; Tahoe National Forest, (916) 586-3558.
Forest Service (USFS) for deployment in the Tahoe National Forest in California.
More than 150 years ago, pioneers on the Tahoe National Forest searched for gold and other precious metals by shooting water through high-pressure hoses to eat away at hillsides and slopes.
Some public lands have prior mining claims on them, though, so check with these Forest Service offices before you pan: Tahoe National Forest, (916) 265-4531; Eldorado National Forest, (916) 644-6048; Stanislaus National Forest, (209) 532-3671; and Sierra National Forest, (209) 297-0706.
TPL conveyed both properties to the Tahoe National Forest for permanent public stewardship.
His accidental career choice eventually led to his current position as a silviculturist for Tahoe National Forest, one he's held for the past 14 years.
Yet civilization might seem a world away as you cast for trout or cool your hike-weary feet in one of these azure jewels of Tahoe National Forest.
TPL purchased the property from SPI and then conveyed it to the Tahoe National Forest for permanent public protection.
Those who read the book or attend the workshops can donate money to plant trees in a special area of the Tahoe National Forest.