Talion


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Talion

 

the principle of retributive punishment (“an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth”) that emerged as a rule of law in tribal societies and was invoked by slaveholders in ancient times. According to talion, the injury inflicted on a guilty person should equal the injury that such person committed. This notion was most vividly expressed in Hammurabi’s code, in Babylonia. It also found expression in ancient European law; some elements of talion, for example, were included in the Twelve Tables of Rome.

Talion, therefore, stemmed from a desire to limit blood feuds by allowing for the exaction of retribution equivalent to an injury done. In modern times talionic ideas have appeared in the writings of a number of philosophers, among them I. Kant and G. Hegel; in the bourgeois science of criminal law; and, preeminently, in the works of the representatives of the classical school of criminal law.

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Talion is armed with a sword, dagger and bow and arrow, but he's too weak initially to take on Sauron's vicious Uruk war chiefs.
Bauschke summarizes: First, because it is the way we want others to treat and not to treat us; second, because it serves our interest and the interest of others and makes more sense than living by the talion principle of retribution; third, because it furthers thinking and acting in a way appropriate to the age of globalization, in which global crises affect all of us and the consequences of our actions, positive and negative, and will eventually return to us as part of a spherical network.
But the premodern Islamic conception came out of explicit Qur'anic regulations of existing practices and corresponded to medieval laws of talion, the "eye-for-an-eye" doctrines that specified rules of retaliation or financial compensation for homicide and personal injury.
Thus the Pathe stencil-colored fairy film La Peine du talion (Tit for Tat) from 1906, featuring hourglass-fugured dancing girls in butterfly costumes skewering a male entomologist on a cork, was followed by an early scientific film of an acrobatic fly in huge close-up performing a series of weight-lifting feats (1908-10).
The President of Uzbekistan said the law of the talion can not be used, those who abide by this principle are enemies, said Karimov.
In doing so she spent two weeks alongside the 4th Bat-t talion The Rifles near Salisbury - where she was quickly put through her paces.
171) that "I' ccart entre les penalties [between the rapist of a married or betrothed woman and an unmarried one, free or slave] est remarquable: la mort, ou parfois le versament d' une rancon, dans le premier eas; l'indemnite ou l' amende, eventuallement assortie d'un talion et d'un marriage reparateur, dans le second cas.
6) It is this concept of talion that accounts for the cyclical nature of insult and redress in Welsh literature and law.
However, to claim that no due has been given to the talion is incorrect, especially in light of the considerable work done on the vindictive emotions in respect of theories of punishment and forgiveness, by such authors as Jeffrie Murphy and Jean Hampton.
It was 'laid up' in the church in 1957 when the 5th Bat talion amalgamated with the 7th Battalion.
revenge-plotting, which subtly invokes the biblical talion law of an eye
He served with the now-defunct 3rd Bat talion Royal Fusiliers and had come home sickened by what he had seen.