Tamburlaine


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Tamerlane

, Tamburlaine
Turkic name Timur . ?1336--1405, Mongol conqueror of the area from Mongolia to the Mediterranean; ruler of Samarkand (1369--1405). He defeated the Turks at Angora (1402) and died while invading China

Tamburlaine

Scythian bandit becomes king of Persia and ruler of Turkey and Babylon. [Br. Drama: Tamburlaine the Great in Magill I, 950]
References in periodicals archive ?
average scene in II Tamburlaine requires at least thirteen players.
Her petition is granted in that he conquers unharmed, but given Tamburlaine's defiant rhetoric and unhindered triumph, the point is that her prayer exhibits effeminate weakness and a misunderstanding on her part of where the true power of the world (and of the play) lies--not with Jove or Mahomet but with Tamburlaine himself.
Besides the contemporaneity of Tamburlaine and Scanderbeg, '[t]he two leaders' opposition to the Turks united them further in the popular imagination, and as at least one critic has suggested, the Tamburlaine/Bajazeth dynamic may conceivably have been replicated in the form of the Scanderbeg/Mahomet II relationship'.
21) Unlike Samuel Daniel, who wrote A Defence of Ryme (1603), Marlowe did not record his views on poetry, but he outlines his poetics and the formal solutions it entails in a blank verse "sonnet" in 7 Tamburlaine, first identified by Paul H.
This particular time before Ash Wednesday and the start of the Lenten season is also noteworthy in the performance of Tamburlaine.
Gaskell declares that the focal point of Part II of Tamburlaine is Marlowe's 'rhetorical assault' on religious convictions (Kocher1962:xxiii).
You were pulling Tamburlaine in his chariot at the time, I believe, and missed all the excitement.
MacKenzie devotes a chapter to each of the plays, treating the two Tamburlaine plays as a composite entity, and provides an introduction and a brief biographical conclusion.
It is this complex web of diverse economic and cultural forces that informs Christopher Marlowe's play Tamburlaine, and elides it with the nexus of vested interests of some Anglo-oriental mercantile groups who were promoting the advantages of the
Tamburlaine then explicitly cues her first two speeches by terms of address--his first speech is linguistically and (presumably) dramaturgically oriented towards her: "Come lady, let not this appal your thoughts" (1).
Given that these discussions of kingship were intimately bound to the discussions of religion, especially divine providence, it is not surprising that Christopher Marlowe found contemporary relevance in Lucan's portrait of Neronian Rome when he came to write Tamburlaine (published 1590).
Tamburlaine was the third of the great Mongol warrior leaders, successor