Teide Observatory


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Teide Observatory

(tay -dee) An observatory at Izaña, altitude 2400 meters, on the island of Tenerife in the Canaries. Facilities are shared by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Institute of Astrophysics of the Canaries) with several European countries. There are some major solar telescopes, including the German Vacuum Tower Telescope, which has a 70-cm aperture mirror, focal ratio f/76. The observatory also has eight telescopes for nocturnal use and three instruments or arrays for observing the cosmic microwave background (see VSA). The observatory began operating in 1964. See also Roque de los Muchachos Observatory.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2015 and the beginning of 2016, the team made these measurements from a ground-based station at the Teide Observatory in Tenerife, Spain.
The island is also home to one of the world's most advanced astronomical observatories, the Teide Observatory, from which the entire northern hemisphere and part of the southern hemisphere can be viewed Bordering the National Park, the elevated adults-only Spa Villalba is perfectly positioned to marvel at the night sky.
Tenerife's Teide National Park boasts extraordinarily clear skies and the island is home to one of the world's most advanced astronomical observatories, the Teide Observatory.
Europe's Teide Observatory Tenerife Asteroid Survey team has been credited with discovering comet P/2014 C1, named 'TOTAS' in recognition of the teamwork involved in the find.
While approaching the island, I peered through the airplane window at the top of Teide Mountain high above the clouds and immediately recognized the telescopes of Teide Observatory in the Izana district of the island.
Piecing together data from Hubble and images taken hours to days later by a telescope at Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, Spain, Weaver estimates that the debris moves at 109 km an hour and probably separated from the comet a mere 2 days before Hubble took the picture.
Members of the Teide Observatory Tenerife Asteroid Survey started by Matthias Busch from Heppenheim, Germany, discovered two new near-Earth objects during the last year while working with our observing programme," Koschny added.
7-meter (28-inch) solar telescope of Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands to take infrared spectra of sunlight passing through Venus's atmosphere.
Raphael Rebolo and his colleagues at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias in La Laguna, Spain, discovered the candidate while analyzing images of the Pleiades taken with a telescope at Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands.