Telemachus


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Telemachus

(təlĕm`əkəs): see OdysseusOdysseus
, Lat. Ulysses , in Greek mythology, son and successor of King Laertes of Ithaca. A leader of Greek forces during the Trojan War, Odysseus was noted (as in the Iliad) for his cunning strategy and his wise counsel.
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Telemachus

relentlessly searches for father, Odysseus. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
See: Quest
References in classic literature ?
Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors, let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for it is a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has; but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formal notice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turn about, at your own cost.
My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if some rumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now.
14} She it was who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him better than any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed him when he was a baby.
16} But Telemachus as he lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night through of his intended voyage and of the counsel that Minerva had given him.
Dupond could evoke the men both in Homer's epic poem and in James Joyce's novel: Ulysses (known as Odysseus to the Greeks), Bloom, Telemachus, Dedalus, Poldy, Henry Fleury, and sometimes Zeus or Poseidon--friends and enemies together in the same actor.
the wish to belong and the wish to break free, the quest for identity and the fear of disgraceful identification, the innate filial piety of Telemachus and the parricidal yearnings of Oedipus' (x).
He symbolizes Telemachus, the son of Ulysses (Odysseus), here represented by Leopold Bloom, the universal man.
9) It may be relevant that as the degradation of the punishment increases so too does its distance from Odysseus, who is directly responsible for the deaths of the suitors and Leodes, whereas Telemachus supervises the hanging of the maids, and the identity of the assailants of Melanthius is not even revealed (any more than is the idea's originator), as if he were too despicable for giving such details to be justified.
In this version Telemachus went in search of news of his father not to Menelaus in Sparta but to Idomeneus in Crete.
Homer has Telemachus sail to Pylos not to find Odysseus but to look for him.
Before Odysseus set sail for Troy, he entrusted the education of his son Telemachus to his friend Mentor.
There, in disguise, he meets his son Telemachus, now grown to manhood, routs and kills the suitors who throng his palace, and is reunited with his loyal wife Penelope.