Teletype


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Teletype

(hardware, product)
(tty) A trademark for a hard-copy teletypewriter produced by Teletype Corporation.

teletype

(2)

Teletype

The trade name of Teletype Corporation, which refers to a variety of teleprinters used for communications. The Teletype was one of the first communications terminals in the U.S.


The Teletype Machine
For years, the clicking and clanging of Teletype machines were familiar sounds in the "wire rooms" of many companies. (Image courtesy of Honeywell, Inc.).
References in periodicals archive ?
Established in 1981, TeleType has emerged to become a leader in the field of Global Positioning Systems and was the first company to offer a portable GPS solution for commercial truck drivers.
The teletype's ability to transmit messages by radio, known as radio teletype, or Radio Automatic Teletype (RATT), enabled the Navy to communicate with its planes in a speedier manner and was seen by the Department of the Navy as a "'marked step in advance,'" according to an article from the New York Times dated Aug.
Four radio teletype channels, twelve point-to-point frequencies and three air-to-ground channels were in operation.
Nowhere in this teletype does it say that this happened (seven) months ago," Jones said.
Operators older than 45 generally refused to knuckle under and become teletype operators.
These are the kinds of thoughts that went through my young head as I would be banging the tuning fork against the palm of my hand in an attempt to sort out my TTY 76/98 which probably had just gone berserk for the fourth time in my eight-hour shift in the back of the message center vehicle (an AN/GRC 142); a vehicle we would affectionately refer to as a CRTTZ (HF Radio Teletype Secure).
Regarding the article on the use of "--30--" at the end of copy, in the October/November issue: When I was a copyboy at the Evening Bulletin in Philadelphia, starting in 1948, and tore incoming copy off many a Teletype machine, articles ended with "--30--" and messages often ended with "--73--".
An operator could output reflectance data to a teletype machine, which produced a punched tape.
Patti Wysocki writes in her Ultimate Guide to Newsletter Publishing, "Most of their subscribers didn't have computers yet, so the premium for signing up was an $800 Texas Instrument computer (more like a teletype machine), which hooked into their phones.