Tephritidae

(redirected from Tephritid fruit fly)

Tephritidae

[tə′frid·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The fruit flies, a family of myodarian cyclorrhaphous dipteran insects in the subsection Acalyptratae.

Tephritidae

 

a family of flies. The body is usually 3–5 mm long and bears multicolored wings. There are about 4,000 species, which are distributed in all parts of the world. The larvae are herbivorous and develop in fruits, inflorescences, or leaves. Some species damage fruit (including grapes) and vegetable crops. The Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) damages the juicy fruits of more than 200 plant species. The cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi) eats cherries, and Myiopardalis pardalina damages muskmelons, watermelons, pumpkins, and cucumbers. The olive fruit fly (Dacus oleae) destroys olive crops.

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Mortality in three African tephritid fruit fly puparia and adults caused by the entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana.
In Hawaii, the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, is one of four nonnative tephritid fruit fly species that cause up to $15 million annually in direct losses to the state's fruit and vegetable crops, including squash, melon, cucumber, and tomato.
Approximately 2000 berries were collected during this study from different regions of Germany, examined for signs of piercing and then cut open to examine any infestation by the larvae of the tephritid fruit fly (Rhagoletis meigenii).
Oviposition response and development of the egg-pupal parasitoid Fopius arisanus on Bactrocera oleae, a tephritid fruit fly pest of olive in the Mediterranean basin.
Effect of soil temperature and moisture on survival and infectivity of Metarhizium anisopliae to four tephritid fruit fly puparia.
The classical biological control of invasive tephritid fruit fly pests using hymenopteran parasitoids has been used in Hawaii.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of both phenylacetaldehyde and 1,4-DMB for attractiveness in traps relative to fresh and aged torula yeast, a protein bait used for tephritid fruit fly monitoring.
Adult tephritid fruit fly females require protein sources for adequate egg production, and ammonia and its derivatives serve as volatile cues to locate protein-rich food.
In southern Brazil, Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a tephritid fruit fly species of great economic importance, also considered a major pest of fruit crops in temperate regions (Nava & Botton 2010; Garcia & Norrbom 2011; Nunes et al.
In the case of tephritid fruit fly SIT, the release of only males avoids the fruit damage caused by oviposition attempts by irradiated females (sterile stings), avoids matings between sterile males and sterile females and increases dispersal of sterile males searching for wild females (Rendon et al.