recombinant

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recombinant

Genetics
1. produced by the combining of genetic material from more than one origin
2. a chromosome, cell, organism, etc., the genetic makeup of which results from recombination

recombinant

[rē′käm·bə·nənt]
(genetics)
Any new cell, individual, or molecule that is produced in the laboratory by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology or that arises naturally as a result of recombination.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014;99[5];1694-700), which also showed that the combination of teriparatide and denosumab outperformed either drug alone, and the cumulative 4-year outcomes from its extension study DATA-Switch (Lancet.
Kazuki, "Successful treatment of nonunion with teriparatide after failed ankle arthrodesis for Charcot arthropathy," Osteoporosis International, vol.
Gomberg SJ, Wustrack RL, Napoli N et al: Teriparatide, Vitamin D, and Calcium healed bilateral subtrochanteric stress fractures in a postmenopausal woman with a 13-year history of continuous alendronate therapy.
Physicians prescribed teriparatide more often for Latinas based on multiple risk factors for fracture and intolerance to previous osteoporosis therapy and to white women based on inadequate response to previous therapy or new (incident) fractures.
In one, subjects were randomized to subcutaneous abaloparatide, teriparatide (Forteo) at its approved dose of 20 meg by daily subcutaneous injection, or placebo (see graphic).
Nausea, headaches and leg cramps are not infrequent in patients treated with teriparatide.
The model simulates patient interventions with an 18-month regimen of daily teriparatide use as a first-line treatment.
Additionally, combining antiresorptive agents with teriparatide may be an option for the most severe cases of osteoporosis with frequent fractures although the cost of such treatment will likely significantly limit its use.
Over the 12-month study period, one group received a subcutaneous 60 mg dose of denosumab every six months, another group self-administered daily 20-microgram injections of teriparatide, and the third group received both drugs at the same dosage schedules.
Additionally, according to the report, teriparatide therapy was started after pubic ramus fractures, 3 months later than the first fracture.
About two months after the device was implanted--and after the immune system's protective barrier had formed--wireless signals programmed the device to release daily doses of teriparatide.