Teshuvah

Teshuvah

September-October; during the month of Tishri between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
The ten days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known to Jews as Aseret Yemey Tushuvah, or Ten Days of Penitence . They are a time for reflection, introspection, and repentance, during which people apologize to one another for any wrongs they may have committed during the previous year. The Hebrew word teshuvah means "turning." According to tradition, an unfavorable verdict about one's behavior may be changed by repentance and charity. Each day the famous prayer of confession, which begins "Our Father, our King," is recited at the service in the temple.
In Palestine, pilgrimages are made during this period to the tomb of Rachel and other sacred burial places, as well as to the graves of relatives. In other countries, it is customary to visit the local cemetery. No weddings or banquets may be held during these days, and scholarly Jews spend their time reading and studying the sacred books.
The atmosphere during this time is not one of sadness but of thoughtfulness and kindness. Jews often greet one another by saying, Gemar Hatimah Tovah, which means, "May the final verdict be favorable."
CONTACTS:
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America
11 Broadway
New York, NY 10004
212-563-4000; fax: 212-564-9058
www.ou.org
(c)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
5) The tractate as a whole deals with the rituals and meaning of Yom Kippur, the most fundamental gesture of which is teshuvah, a turning toward other persons as well as toward God--an approach which aspires to but does not always achieve full reconciliation.
As she "returned" as a ba-alat teshuvah through her local Chabad, she is now most concerned that her daughters marry boys who wear kippot.
Personal conversion, or the turn-about described in Hebrew as teshuvah, should be experienced as a blessed event in the context of the breakthroughs of the power of the Realm.
This is apparent in the value that Wiesel attributes to silence and in Fackenheim's conviction that Jewish tikkun and teshuvah (return or response) are necessarily fragmentary.
Two such novels that concern us here are Dara Horn's award-winning, phantasmagorical fiction of several generations of intertwined families in In the Image (2002) and Ruchama King's Seven Blessings (2003), which describes the baal teshuvah (religious returnee) movement and religious dating scene of Americans in Israel.
In addition to the insight it provides into the perspectives of Orthodox women, Seven Blessings also studies another sub-group within this society: ba'alei teshuvah, Jews who have "returned" to Orthodoxy after having been raised in less observant homes.
30] When religious problems arose, synagogue boards needing guidance would occasionally write to the beit din of London or Amsterdam for a teshuvah, a rabbinic response to a halakhic question.
The distinction between "religious therapist" and "therapist who happens to be religious" and Spero's awareness of the necessity to allow a patient to develop his or her own personal relationship to religious belief and practice are also apparent in papers in the late 1970s and 1980s on clinical work with cult devotees, ba'alei teshuvah and other "penitent personalities," and "nouveaux religionists.
Always leave yourself open to the possibility of teshuvah, your own and that of others.
The Church's sense of teshuvah is real and apparent for all the world to see.
In a study of ba'alot teshuvah, Deborah Kaufman asserts that "every aspect of orthodoxy serves to separate Jews from the larger society--keeping kosher, the Sabbath, rituals, dress, and even the lunar calendar"; such practices also tend to create distance between the ba'alot teshuvah and their birth families.
In the spirit of teshuvah, the authors "acknowledge with shame the suffering that this distorted portrayal [of the Jews as unfaithful] has caused the Jewish people.