Test coverage


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Test coverage

(testing)
A measure of the proportion of a program exercised by a test suite, usually expressed as a percentage. This will typically involve collecting information about which parts of a program are actually executed when running the test suite in order to identify which branches of conditional statements which have been taken.

The most basic level of test coverage is code coverage testing and the most methodical is path coverage testing. Some intermediate levels of test coverage exist, but are rarely used.

The standard Unix tool for measuring test coverage is tcov, which annotates C or Fortran source with the results of a test coverage analysis. GCT is a GNU equivalent.
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Companies need to determine early in the design phase how to maximize test coverage using the minimum number of test points, so it is essential to know what JTAG access is available at the schematic stage of the design process.
Powered by regularly updated market and proprietary data, the Ultimate Test Coverage Toolkit enables users to stay ahead of the curve and consistently deliver great digital experiences to their customers through a variety of features and resources, including:
Boundary scan enables test coverage at the in-circuit test stations in limited test access situations.
TestWay's test coverage analysis module to allow users to estimate and measure the overall test coverage provided by either a single piece of test equipment or a combination of test systems, from the test equipment list.
The TestWay Coverage Analyst provides a push-button test coverage analysis tool for coverage estimation (pre-test program development) and coverage measurement (post-test program measurement) using PCOLA-SOQ1for the Agilent Medalist i3070 and i1000 platforms and other test and inspection equipment on the user's production line, such as optical and X-ray inspection, boundary scan tester, MDA and functional test.
With more test methods evolving from boundary scan, one can now expect boundary scan to provide test coverage beyond just boundary scan devices.
Usually, an optimum test strategy boils down to achieving maximum test coverage at an acceptable cost level (Figure 1).
While some of those solutions offer improved test coverage by combining boundary scan and ATE resources, they introduce new problems like skewed test-coverage statistics and very limited portability.
SpyGlass-DFT provided test coverage at the RTL-level and helped address scan and testability issues early in the design cycle.
It also determines the extent of a design's boundary scan test coverage and recommends changes to increase coverage.
The XJTAG system has been implemented at Prism's 6,500 square foot manufacturing facility in St Ives, England, where it has led to significantly improved production test coverage - up to 98% for certain boards - and it is also being used extensively for new product introductions and prototype verification.