tetrachloroethylene

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tetrachloroethylene

[¦te·trə¦klȯr·ō′eth·ə‚lēn]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mutagenicity of tetrachloroethene in the Ames test: metabolic activation by conjugation with glutathione.
But there is little if any propane or tetrachloroethene, substances that would betray an industrial origin.
In a similar manner, high sulphate concentrations in groundwater can hinder the natural anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethene.
Soil and ground water monitoring in 1989 and again in the 1990's disclosed metals including lead, silver, copper, nickel and zinc in the soil samples, and certain VOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene were detected in the ground water samples.
After reviewing records and inspections conducted in 2006, DEP determined that the company failed to notify the agency of a release of Tetrachloroethene found at its location, failed to comply with operational requirements for its dry cleaning machine, and discharged industrial wastewater (washing machine wastewater) into a storm drain without approval from DEP or the U.
One sample contained tetrachloroethene at nine times greater than the WHO guidance values for exposure limits and 70 times the US Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for drinking water.
The methods are organized by substance and presented in sections on aldehydes, cadmium, diesel engine emissions, ethylene glycol derivatives, ethylene oxide, metalworking fluid aerosols and vapors, N-nitrosamines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, quartz, styrene, sulfuric acid, tetrachloroethene, and volatile inorganic acids.
But Myers said the plan does not account for other contaminants, including trichloroethylene, a colorless liquid used as a solvent for cleaning metal parts, and tetrachloroethene, which is widely used for dry cleaning of fabrics and for metal-degreasing.
Tetrachloroethene, or perc, was used in making scissors, and elevated concentrations of the solvent were detected in soil and groundwater in 1992.
209) Finally, although exposure to volatile organic compounds in the drinking water was not expected to increase overall cancer or non-cancer risk, the study found that carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethene exceeded their RBCs.
Perchloroethylene is also known as tetrachloroethylene and tetrachloroethene.
Stained soil was noted and the staining was found to be the result of contamination of the soil by tetrachloroethene (PCE).