Tetragrammaton


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Tetragrammaton

Bible the Hebrew name for God revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai (Exodus 3), consisting of the four consonants Y H V H (or Y H W H) and regarded by Jews as too sacred to be pronounced. It is usually transliterated as Jehovah or Yahweh
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While Jews are forbidden by the Oral Law to pronounce the Tetragrammaton (TB Kiddushin 71a, Pesahim 50a; cf.
The translations chosen for the Tetragrammaton in the Bibel in gerechter Sprache are mostly "God" and Adonai, and only afterwards the "Living One" in the feminine grammatical form.
When Chloe asks whether the letters of the Tetragrammaton are "real," Arglay replies that they are "real in another manner--more or less real than we are" (MD 38-9).
In addition to ignoring the fact that the letters yod and heh do not constitute the Tetragrammaton but only the first two letters of it, these views ignore the fact that the central figure is clearly doomed, both in the original statue and in Blake's representation of it.
It is, I think, the Tetragrammaton, the name of God given to Moses out of the burning bush.
jaspar + Melchior Balthasar Ananyzapta tetragrammaton +(29)
Likening his own linguistic procedure to that of his "transcendental colleague," the Hebrew God JHVH, the narrator reflects on the secret revealed in the Sefer Jetsirah, JHVH's "instruction book" containing the method by which the whole of creation emanates from the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet, by means of combinations dominated by the tetragrammaton JHVH, and the "three mothers" A, M, and SH.
The Tetragrammaton `LORD' was retained in faithfulness to the Hebrew text and designated by small caps.
This Will be true even when we know the charm that moves the key, when we can bring each other With our eyes like Arthurian lovers, or by uttering a code like the tetragrammaton Or old embroidery.
In Chapter 4, Davis moves from Greek to Christian mythology and to God-the-Four-Letter-Word ("Jehovah" being a flawed rendering of the Greek tetragrammaton ["four-letter word"] used by the Jews for the unspeakable Old Testamental "Yahweh").
In the same work, another set of four--a hammer and sickle, a cross, a pair of crossed daggers, and a star--forms a kind of tetragrammaton out of the emblems of communism, Christianity, militarism, and capitalism.
According to the editors, this change was made to avoid confusing the public with a name bearing the plural ending im, an exception being Genesis 1:27, where the editors regard the phrase be-tzelem Elohim, in the image of God, as too well known for it to be altered (they also note in the Appendix to Genesis, "The targumist does not change Elohim to the Tetragrammaton where a pronoun is attached to Elohim, such as 'our God'").