Thargelia


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Thargelia

May-June
This ancient Greek festival was celebrated in Athens on the sixth and seventh days of the ancient Greek month of Thargelion (which fell sometime between late May and early June) to honor Apollo. In addition to offerings of first fruits, or the first bread from the new wheat, it was customary to select two condemned criminals (either two men or a man and a woman) to act as scapegoats for community guilt. First they were led through the city and then driven out and banished. If circumstances warranted a greater sacrifice, they were killed—either thrown into the sea or burned on a pyre. On the second day of the festival there was an offering of thanksgiving, a procession, and the official registration ceremony for individuals who had been adopted.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 67
NewCentClassHandbk-1962, p. 1069
OxClassDict-1970, p. 1051
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23) The Thargelia was scapegoat ritual: the Athenians would select, feed and expel a [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] from the city.
Such scapegoating of course was not uncommon in the Athens of Sophocles and Socrates, as both ritual expiation (at the Thargelia festival) and political ostracism.
opens with the matter-of-fact mention of Diotima, Thargelia, and Aspesia as evidence that even women were philosophers .
For Girard's, the recipe/panacea of human sacrifice was the dark secret behind the rituals and sublime myths of--for instance--the Attic festival of the Thargelia, when two 'ugly men' were fattened and then fogged through the city (to 'absorb the pollution') before being driven into exile.
The role of the phratriai in the Apaturia and Thargelia festivals and in the cults of Zeus Phratrios and Athena Phratria, as well as details of the cultic activity of phratries and their subgroups, give some credence to the Aristotelian claim (Ath.
When we look at our miracle closely, we see that it greatly resembles the famous or infamous Greek ritual of the pharmakos always performed during the Thargelia festival, perhaps on other occasions as well.
Celebrations of the Thargelia (in honour of Apollo) also may have included feasts attended by both men and women: for example, there is a story that during the Thargelia that takes place while the Milesians are besieging Naxos, one of the invading captains (Diognetus) falls in love with a Naxian girl (Polycrite), who contrives that during the Thargelia festivities a message be sent to her brothers to attack.
An anonymous treatise on warrior women, printed in Westermann's Paradoxographoi (213-18, xli-xlii), relates short biographies of fourteen women: the barbarians Semiramis, Zarinaia, Nitocris of Egypt, Nitocris of Babylon, Theiosso (=Dido), Atossa, Rhodogyne, Lyde, Tomyris, and Onomaris, and the Greeks Argeia, Pheretime, Thargelia, and Artemisia.
Women like Aspasia and Thargelia excelled in influencing statesmen, but hardly can be classified as spies.
solo kithara-playing became an official event at the Pythian festival along with aulesis and kitharody;(40) and musical events and competitions were a central feature of the remodelled festivals of the Panathenaea, Thargelia, and City Dionysia.
4 the author alludes to choregoi being needed each year for the Dionysia, Thargelia, Panathenaia, Prometheia, and Hephaistia.