Golden mean

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golden mean

[‚gōld·ən ′mēn]
(mathematics)

Golden mean

A proportional relationship devised by the Greeks that expresses the ideal relationship of unequal parts. It is obtained by dividing a line so that the shorter part is to the longer part as the longer part is to the whole line. It can be stated thus: a is to b as b is to a+ b. If we assign the value of 1 to a, and solve as a quadratic equation, then b = 1.618034. Therefore, the golden mean is 1:1.618.

golden mean

or section a proportion between the length and width of a rectangle or two portions of a line, said to be ideal. [Fine Arts: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
I would emphasise here that Kennedy's use of the Golden Mean falls into this category as well.
24) Unfortunately, while there are many authentic manifestations of the Golden Mean to be found across human pursuits, it is often difficult to distinguish these from overly optimistic seekers who retrospectively juxtapose the ratio onto older works with insufficient evidence or justification.
Monsarrat, Professor of Languages at the University of Burgundy, in Dijon, France, arguing successfully that the Elegy bore marked resemblances to John Ford Christ's Bloody Sweat and The Golden Mean, both published in 1613.
For example, big name exhibitor investment bank Merrill Lynch, the show's sponsors, has been at work creating a garden using the ancient, sacred geometric principle of the Golden Mean.
They then drew rough diagrams or thumbnail sketches of the works they had selected, and described to the class how the works were organized in terms of the Golden Mean (see diagram).
I had vaguely hoped that some archetypes with strong forms such as the Mandala might be discovered to form a justification for formal architecture and also justify ideas of proportion and the Golden Mean.
With this simple truth so vividly illustrated, the author goes on to describe the principles of controlling our thoughts and our body, the proper use of mortification (it's a means to an end, not an end in itself), and how to preserve the golden mean between extremes.
Finally, Qutb believes that while Darwin, Freud and Marx sought to demean men and women by claiming absolute animal origins (Darwin), or demonstrating their dirty sexual nature (Freud), or their insignificance compared to material and economic factors (Marx), which could have destroyed all moral values and civilization itself had their concepts not failed, Islam alone provides the golden mean for a flourishing and prosperous civilization through its comprehensive world view.
In the Frederician concept of cortesia, many values such as loyalty, wisdom, nobility of spirit, and the golden mean are applicable equally to men as well as women.
Also known as the Golden Mean, it was discovered by the Greeks c.
Rather, she cajoles her readers into examining the absurdity of extreme behavior and intimates, if anything, that they should follow the Golden Mean.
Despite its derivative nature, The Golden Mean is one of the very few son-of-Balanchine ballets with a life of its own.