Golden mean

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golden mean

[‚gōld·ən ′mēn]
(mathematics)

Golden mean

A proportional relationship devised by the Greeks that expresses the ideal relationship of unequal parts. It is obtained by dividing a line so that the shorter part is to the longer part as the longer part is to the whole line. It can be stated thus: a is to b as b is to a+ b. If we assign the value of 1 to a, and solve as a quadratic equation, then b = 1.618034. Therefore, the golden mean is 1:1.618.

golden mean

or section a proportion between the length and width of a rectangle or two portions of a line, said to be ideal. [Fine Arts: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Interpreting and expanding The Golden Mean with "Neutrosophic tetrad" (thesis-antithesis-neutrothesis-neutrosynthesis)
I would emphasise here that Kennedy's use of the Golden Mean falls into this category as well.
The Golden Mean was considered a "divine proportion" by the ancient groups because it represented the harmony in the universe.
The golden mean is, however, more of a metaphor than a blueprint for moral decision making (1) and action.
24) Unfortunately, while there are many authentic manifestations of the Golden Mean to be found across human pursuits, it is often difficult to distinguish these from overly optimistic seekers who retrospectively juxtapose the ratio onto older works with insufficient evidence or justification.
The sculptor Phidias also is thought to have used [PHI] in many of his works, and this association is the source of the symbol used to represent the golden mean.
Specifically, Durer was interested in Platonic and Archimedean solids and the golden mean and how these mathematical concepts influenced proportion and geometric ratios in art, affecting beauty and meaning.
Monsarrat, Professor of Languages at the University of Burgundy, in Dijon, France, arguing successfully that the Elegy bore marked resemblances to John Ford Christ's Bloody Sweat and The Golden Mean, both published in 1613.
They then drew rough diagrams or thumbnail sketches of the works they had selected, and described to the class how the works were organized in terms of the Golden Mean (see diagram).
I had vaguely hoped that some archetypes with strong forms such as the Mandala might be discovered to form a justification for formal architecture and also justify ideas of proportion and the Golden Mean.
With this simple truth so vividly illustrated, the author goes on to describe the principles of controlling our thoughts and our body, the proper use of mortification (it's a means to an end, not an end in itself), and how to preserve the golden mean between extremes.