Night Watch

(redirected from The Night Watch)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Night Watch

July 13
La Retraite aux Flambeaux, or the Night Watch, is a half-holiday in France that is celebrated on the eve of Bastille Day. The lights in Paris are darkened in remembrance of the day in 1789 when the Bastille fell. Colorful processions of soldiers, patriotic bands, and people bearing torches and Chinese lanterns march through the streets, followed by crowds of spectators. The procession usually ends at the home of a prominent citizen, who offers the torch- and lantern-bearers something to drink.
CONTACTS:
French Government Tourist Office
444 Madison Ave., 16th Fl.
New York, NY 10022
800-391-4909 or 212-838-7800; fax: 212-838-7855
www.francetourism.com
SOURCES:
AnnivHol-2000, p. 117
BkFest-1937, p. 125
References in periodicals archive ?
The Night Watch goes out on Tuesday, July 12, at 9pm on BBC2.
The discussion of these three domestic genres--pendants, double portraits, and family portraits--reintroduces the Night Watch and other images of all-male association, or "homosocial pastoral.
Like all of Waters' novels, The Night Watch contains intensely real erotic moments.
Only a book reviewer on assignment would find herself faced with the necessity of placing Piercy's sixteenth novel, Sex Wars, cheek by jowl with Waters' fourth, The Night Watch.
The Night Watch, with its measured, intimate postwar tone, has shown that Waters can write more than lush, Victorian melodrama, but it also shows that Waters continues to be dedicated to writing about lesbians.
The Night Watch is quieter, with more of a depth of emotion, compared to the flamboyance of my Victorian books.
On the other hand, the Night Watch and their friends look like downtrodden working stiffs in out-of-date duds, who have alcohol problems (these vampires drink both vodka and blood).
Compelling: Viv, played by Jodie Whittaker, in The Night Watch.
The latest is an adaptation of Welsh author Sarah Waters' novel The Night Watch that examines the lives and loves of young people living in Bath during the war.
The latest is an adaptation of Sarah Waters' novel The Night Watch that examines the lives and loves of young people living in Bath during the war.
The Night watch service operates between 8pm and 7am seven nights a week.
Based on a team of demon fighers, the Night Watch, who fight the daily battle between the forces of Day and Night and keep the world safe for the rest of us, this is a great adventure which crossed over to English language territories well.