Ancient Mariner

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Ancient Mariner

cursed by the crew because his slaying of the albatross is causing their deaths. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge The Rime of the Ancient Mariner]
See: Curse

Ancient Mariner

telling his tale is penance for his guilt. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”]

Ancient Mariner

he and his crew nearly die of thirst. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge The Ancient Mariner]
See: Thirst

Ancient Mariner

Coleridge’s wandering sailor. [Br. Lit.: “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” in Norton, 597–610]
References in periodicals archive ?
on centre stage 3Back ONLY a month ago Everton's central defensive options resembled the Rime of the Ancient Mariner - "water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.
Actually, that step was taken more to prevent cheating: I'd scrawled the first four stanzas of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner on the belly of my rodent.
Many familiar elements are borrowed from sources such as Robinson Crusoe, and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
It is endlessly fascinating to discover the sort of mind it took to write The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
The event was organised by Cardiff University lecturer Chris Glynn, in order to launch the 80-day Coleridge in Wales Festival, which celebrates Samuel Taylor Coleridge's famous poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
The event was organised by Cardiff University lecturer Chris Glynn to launch the 80-day Coleridge In Wales Festival, which celebrates Samuel Taylor Coleridge's famous poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
The second room focuses on three sets of engravings produced for the Golden Cockerell Press: the Book of Jonah, the Chester Play of the Deluge, and the Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
Comparison of the wood engravings he made for Gulliver's Travels (1925) or The Chester Play of the Deluge (1927) with the copper engravings he made for The Rime of the Ancient Mariner reveals Jones's subtle responsiveness to the different conditions and demands of each medium.
Conrad also uses the legend of the Flying Dutchman to explain the crime and curse of the old captain, and Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798) to describe the uncanny, death-ridden plight of the ship.
What was it Coleridge may have wanted to convey through his well-known metaphor of the "Night-mare Life-in-Death" announced in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the version published in Sibylline Leaves in 1817?
The artist also chose to accompany her exhibition with the lines "day after day, day after day, we stuck, nor breath nor motionI" as idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean," from the poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge