traveler

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traveller

(US), traveler
1. a part of a mechanism that moves in a fixed course
2. Nautical
a. a thimble fitted to slide freely on a rope, spar, or rod
b. the fixed rod on which such a thimble slides

traveler, traveler curtain

On the stage of a theater, a curtain that closes the proscenium when drawn.
References in classic literature ?
said the traveller, rising and holding the door open, as the gentleman crossed the room towards it with his arm drawn through his daughter's.
In this room, after having had their quarters for the night allotted to them by two young Fathers, the travellers presently drew round the hearth.
You have a lantern there, I see,' said the traveller dismounting,
Give me the light,' returned the traveller, snatching it from his hand, 'and don't ask idle questions of a man who is in no mood for talking.
He invited the travellers present to judge for themselves whether Mr.
Still mindful of the slur that had been cast on one of his best bedchambers, the manager took occasion to ask the travellers the next morning how they liked their room.
On the morning of the 9th of September, the travellers parted company with their Indian friends, and continued on their course to the west.
They were hailed by the travellers with that joy with which a beacon on a seashore is hailed by mariners after a long and dangerous voyage.
They have but to cross what was once the vineyard, belonging to what was once the Monastery, to come into the narrow back lane wherein stands the crazy wooden house of two low stories currently known as the Travellers' Twopenny:- a house all warped and distorted, like the morals of the travellers, with scant remains of a lattice-work porch over the door, and also of a rustic fence before its stamped-out garden; by reason of the travellers being so bound to the premises by a tender sentiment (or so fond of having a fire by the roadside in the course of the day), that they can never be persuaded or threatened into departure, without violently possessing themselves of some wooden forget-me-not, and bearing it off.
During the day and night that they were encamped in company with the travellers, their conduct was friendly in the extreme.