undercliff

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undercliff

[′ən·dər‚klif]
(geology)
A subordinate cliff or terrace formed by material which has fallen or slid from above.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Along with the undercliff, between Luccombe Bay in the east and Blackgang Chine in the west, the chines provide the only habitat on the British Isles for the Glanville fritillary butterfly.
This area of broken ground is known as the undercliff, and has largely been left unmanaged, not only because attempts to control it would be extremely difficult and costly, but also because this unique feature of the Isle of Wight is internationally important for wildlife.
Knapp remarks about the different versions of the use of mirrors in screenplay and film: "Pinter gives us two: Sarah, after the first scene on the Undercliff, takes off her wig and stares at her face; Anna, after the last party, sits at her dressing table and stares at herself just before leaving.
The second time Charles runs into Sarah in the Undercliff, she acknowledges him but "seemed to hesitate, as if she would have turned back if she could" (98).
Throughout the Undercliff scenes, Sarah seems primarily to seek, as Grogan and Charles think, the relief of confession.
Surely, too, Fowles has in mind the story of Sleeping Beauty when Charles observes Sarah sleeping--or pricking her finger--in the Undercliff (61, 146).
Detectives say the 53-year-old man was last seen alive early on Wednesday at a well-known gay meeting spot near the Undercliff in Broadstairs, Kent.
Along the undercliff walk at Rottingdean I chalked Chelsea 2, Leeds 1 in massive white letters every 20 yards for half a mile.
Sam and Mary stumble upon Charles and Sara at an abandoned cottage in the undercliff.
Their clandestine meetings are a soft, more innocent echo of the secret encounters in The French Lieutenant's Woman between Charles and Sarah in the Undercliff, which Charles describes as an "English Garden of Eden" (62).
Fowles's fiction bristles with such magical glades, haunted by lush fertility and potential (Conchis's villa in The Magus, the Undercliff in The French Lieutenant's Woman, Breasley's manoir in "The Ebony Tower" immediately spring to mind), but in Daniel Martin these places have become fraught with loss and deprivation, in a manner similar to the way in which the alluring women in the earlier stories have now been replaced by Jane's lostness.
towards the back of its arena" in the most secluded part of the magic garden of the Undercliff (166).