Black Death

(redirected from The black death)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

Black Death:

see plagueplague,
any contagious, malignant, epidemic disease, in particular the bubonic plague and the black plague (or Black Death), both forms of the same infection. These acute febrile diseases are caused by Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Black Death

 

the name given by contemporaries to the plague that spread throughout Europe between 1347 and 1353. During that period approximately 25 million people—that is, almost half the population of Europe—died of the Black Death. The pandemic recurred on a smaller scale in 1361 and 1369.

The Black Death resulted in a decline in the number of workers and, consequently, in a rise in the cost of labor. To provide the feudal aristocracy and urban patriciate with cheap labor, the governments of some countries enacted laws fixing wages at pre-plague levels. These measures intensified the class struggle, which found expression in uprisings, the rejection of feudal obligations, and the flight of peasants from their feudal lords.

black death

[¦blak ′deth]
(medicine)

Black Death

killed at least one third of Europe’s population (1348–1349). [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 379–382]
See: Disease

Black Death

the. a form of bubonic plague pandemic in Europe and Asia during the 14th century, when it killed over 50 million people
References in periodicals archive ?
In the wake of the plague: the Black Death and the world it made.
None of these are characteristics of modern plague, despite common misperceptions due to the "heavy hand" of histories of the Black Death.
This reviewer is inclined to give more credit to the Statute of Labour than Poos does, for restraining wages after the Black Death, but is impressed by his calculation that nearly a quarter of all Essex males older than their mid-teens were fined in 1352 for violating the Statute, and, as he notes, "the proportion of all male labourers would thus have been even higher" (p.
Since we are in the middle of a swine flue pandemic it seems to me extremely interesting to compare this social emergency in 2009 with the public's reaction to the Black Death, which killed a third of the population in the middle of the 14th century.
Duncan Higgitt The Black Death: how the rat become Public Enemy Number One: Yersinia pestis, or the bubonic plague, had affected rodents in central Asia for years before the Black Death pandemic began in 1330.
Kelly describes how the Black Death killed about a third of the population of Europe, how individuals attempted to out-run or out-think it, how the Church coped as those it dedicated to caring for the victims died beside them, and how the reduction in the population increased the value of labor and thereby improved the economic lot of the survivors.
It kicks off with a documentary about the Black Death at 9 am on BBC2.
Seven Ages of Britain (C4,8pm) BY the 13thcentury,Britain's foreign rulers seemed to have helped the country prosper - but terror was just around the corner as the Black Death arrived on our shores.
The final chapter 6 examines how doctors offered adv ice to important and distant patients and learned about diseases from other doctors, specifically about the Black Death that arrived in Europe from Genoese trading centers located on the Black Sea in 1347 and wreaked havoc over most of Europe until 1350, thereby reducing the population by one-third.
This chapter continues the conversation about topography, civic, ecclesiastical, commercial, and domestic architecture before concluding with town decline and decay in the wake of the Black Death.
By alluding to the black death, he invokes memories of the vast plague epidemics that ravaged the world.
In this long-awaited volume, Gonick details the clashes of religion and culture in the Middle East, Europe's struggle through the Dark Ages, the Crusades, and even the attack of the Black Death in cartoons that are humane, irreverent, and at times laugh-out-loud funny.