peso

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peso

1. the standard monetary unit, comprising 100 centavos, of Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and the Philippines; formerly also of Guinea-Bissau, where it was replaced by the CFA franc
2. the standard monetary unit of Uruguay, divided into 100 centesimos
3. another name for piece of eight
References in periodicals archive ?
The PESO Santiago City was dubbed as Best Program Implementer of SPES, SRS, Career Guidance Advocacy, and awarded as the 2017 Regional Best PESO for 1st Class Independent Component City category; PESO Penablanca awarded as Best SPES Program Implementer; PESO Abulug for Best Livelihood Program Implementer; PESO Cordon for 2017 Regional Best PESO for 3rd Class Municipal Category; and PESO Tuguegarao City as 2017 Regional BEST PESO for 3rd Class Component City Category.
The time in which we view such changing values of the peso is important for different reasons in assessing our nation's economic development:
According to Promoth Manghat, CEO of UAE Exchange Group, the peso hit its lowest on Wednesday at 52.
Devesh said that Stanchart first turned bearish on the peso in November 2015 largely due to concerns on overvaluation and the deterioration of the current account.
Net foreign selling of Philippine stocks has also surged, weighing on the peso.
Although the peso is currently riding high, currency fluctuations can be very volatile.
Aside from the uncertainties on the political front, Astro del Castillo, director of the Association of Security Analysts of the Philippines, said the peso is also affected by the weakening of other currencies in the region.
dollar and that also expressed against the peso,'' Loo said.
The peso has nose-dived, falling 70% against the dollar and sharply curtailing suddenly expensive imports.
Monday's average was the highest value of the peso since April 16, 2001 when it also hit the 49 level.
The Bolsa, the Mexican stock market, recently reached its yearly high despite political volatility that would have roiled the markets as recently as last year, and the peso has remained stable.
The devaluation came after three years during which Mexico had followed an exchange rate policy of maintaining the peso within a well-defined band against the U.

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