Theileriasis


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Theileriasis

 

(East Coast fever), a transmittable blood disease of cattle caused by protozoans of the genus Theileria. It is prevalent in many countries of Western Europe, Asia, and Africa. In the USSR, theileriasis is found in the Middle Asian republics, Kazakhstan, Transcaucasia, and the Northern Caucasus. The causative agents of theileriasis are specific for the host species that they parasitize; the vectors of the agents are chiefly ticks of the genus Hyalomma. The disease occurs from March to November and peaks in June or July. The incubation period is nine to 12 days. Stricken animals exhibit enlarged lymph nodes, elevated body temperature, anemia, and cardiovascular and digestive disorders. The disease lasts four to seven days if the course is acute and approximately 16 days if it is subacute. Mortality is 60–80 percent or higher. Treatment calls for the use of antimalarials—Quinocide, chlorguanide, and Plasmocid—and agents to relieve symptoms.

REFERENCE

Kolabskii, N. A. Teileriozy zhivotnykh. Leningrad, 1968.
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher incidence of Theileriasis in exotic and crossbreds might be associated with the higher susceptibility to the tick vectors.
Focusing on two diseases affecting African cattle -- trypanosomiasis and theileriasis (East Coast fever)--the researchers there hope to learn enough to control or cure these scourges in 20 to 25 years.
Tick-borne protozoan diseases such as Theileriasis and Babesiosis cause mortality and morbidity in domestic animals in many countries including India.