Theodosian Code


Also found in: Legal.

Theodosian Code

(thē'ədō`shən), Latin Codex Theodosianus, Roman legal code, issued in 438 by Theodosius IITheodosius II,
401–50, Roman emperor of the East (408–50), son and successor of Arcadius. He preferred the study of theology and astronomy to public affairs, which he left to the guidance of his sister, Pulcheria—and, at times, to that of his wife Eudocia.
..... Click the link for more information.
, emperor of the East. It was at once adopted by Valentinian III, emperor of the West. The code was intended to reduce and systematize the complex mass of law that had been issued since the reign of Constantine I. To a large extent it was based upon two private compilations, the Gregorian (Codex Gregorianus) and the Hermogenian (Codex Hermogenianus). The Theodosian Code was used in shaping the Corpus Juris CivilisCorpus Juris Civilis
, most comprehensive code of Roman law and the basic document of all modern civil law. Compiled by order of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I, the first three parts appeared between 529 and 535 and were the work of a commission of 17 jurists presided over by the
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
who later collected the laws from Constantine's time until his own to create his Theodosian Code (created between 429-438).
An example may be found in the Theodosian Code (CT), a codification of law compiled in 438 AD under the emperor Theodosius II.
This creative investigation of underwater archaeology and the provisions for shipowners in the Theodosian Code suggests the advantages gained from promoting the newer ships and the shipowners who helped provide them.
Much of book 12 of the Theodosian Code is concerned with curials trying to evade municipal munera by moving to the countryside, joining the church, the army or the imperial civil service, or seeking admission to the Roman Senate.
Among her topics are the Jewish-Christian schism, the Theodosian Code and laws on Jews, the separation of Sunday from Sabbath, and Christianity in rabbinical literature.
28) While not cited specifically, the sources for this lex and ius were the late third-century Gregorian and Hermogenian Codes; extracts from the commentaries and legal opinions of the third-century jurists Marcian, Ulpian, and Paul; the Theodosian Code (CTh); and some post-Theodosian Novels.
However, some common threads can be drawn from each distinct area analysed: Christian praxis was gradually de-judaised, firstly under the "moral" authority of Church councils, and later under the "judicial" authority of the Theodosian Code.
The Code of the Visigoths, governing what is now Spain and southern France, contained many features of the Roman Theodosian Code, and on Christmas Day 800 A.
That was true even of the titles given bishops in The Theodosian Code (di Berardino).
The Theodosian Code, a decade after Augustine's death, included 120 laws that included punishment by death.
The collection of edicts known as the Theodosian Code (AD 428), which contained legal pronunciamenti from more or less the whole of the fourth century, forbade consultation of magicians or diviners, regarded necromancy as highly dangerous, since it sought to foretell the future by raising and communicating with the dead, and imposed the death penalty on practitioners of magic.
Arjava starts from an awareness of the gaps in the surviving evidence: the Justinianic corpus omitted material in the classical jurists which was obsolete by the sixth century, the title De repudiis is missing from the manuscripts of the Theodosian Code, and the two constitutions from it which are preserved survive only because they were included in the Breviary of Alaric.